• Fun Facts About Semen

    Here’s a well-known fact that we rarely mention: None of us would exist without semen. Why stop there? Let’s learn more about this fluid vital for human life.

    Semen vs Sperm

    People use these terms interchangeably, but they mean different things. Stated simply, semen is the bodily fluid that contains sperm.

    What Else Is In Semen?

    In addition to sperm, semen also contains other ingredients. According to WebMD, “the fluid is made mostly of water, plasma, and mucus (a lubricating substance). It also contains 5 to 25 calories, and is made up of small amounts of essential nutrients including: calcium, citrate, fructose, glucose, lactic acid, magnesium, potassium, protein and zinc.” These ingredients serve an important purpose. Sperm “need nutrients because they must travel a great distance and withstand the harsh environment of the vagina. The nutrients found in semen will keep the sperm alive and provide energy while they race to the egg. Their main energy source is fructose, a type of sugar.”

    Sperm Count / Density

    When men ejaculate they release an average of 2-6 milliliters (mL) of semen, or approximately a 1/2 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon. Each milliliter contains an average of 15 million sperm. Sperm count can be affected by lifestyle, environment and age, though healthy men over age 70 still have the potential to have children.

    Sperm Motility

    Sperm motility is “the percentage of sperm in a sample that are moving, as well as an assessment of how they move,” according to WebMD. “One hour after ejaculation, at least 32% of sperm should be moving forward in a straight line.” And according to Sarah Vij, MD, director of the Center for Male Fertility at Cleveland Clinic, “The optimal timing between ejaculations in a man trying to cause a pregnancy is 24-48 hours to allow for a release of a high number of motile sperm.”

    Sperm Life

    According to a post from Patricio C. Gargollo, M.D. of Mayo Clinic, “The life span of sperm after ejaculation depends on the circumstances. Ejaculated sperm remain viable for several days within the female reproductive tract. Fertilization is possible as long as the sperm remain alive — up to five days. Sperm can also be preserved for decades when semen is frozen.” One thing keeping sperm alive inside the cervix is cervical mucus.

    Healthy Sperm

    WebMD gives the following advice for healthy sperm:

    • Don’t smoke or use illegal drugs, especially anabolic steroids.
    • Avoid toxins such as pesticides and heavy metals.
    • Limit alcohol intake.
    • Maintain a healthy diet and weight.
    • Keep your scrotum cool, because heat slows sperm production. Avoid hot baths and tight pants. Wear boxers instead of briefs.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we are committed to helping men overcome reproductive issues and start healthy families. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-210-6649.

     

  • What Causes Premature Birth?

    According to the CDC, about ten percent of babies were born prematurely in 2020. Let’s look at the causes of this phenomenon, and how to prevent premature births.

    What Qualifies as Premature Birth?

    According to Mayo Clinic, “A premature birth is a birth that takes place more than three weeks before the baby’s estimated due date. In other words, a premature birth is one that occurs before the start of the 37th week of pregnancy.” They also define more particular preterm stages:

    • Late preterm stage – babies born between 34 and 36 completed weeks of pregnancy
    • Moderately preterm – babies born between 32 and 34 weeks of pregnancy
    • Very preterm stage – babies born at less than 32 weeks of pregnancy
    • Extremely preterm stage -babies born at or before 25 weeks of pregnancy

    Complications of Premature Births

    Cleveland Clinic describes many health problems that can afflict preemies, including:

    • Apnea of prematurity, or temporary pauses in breathing during sleep.
    • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or underdeveloped lungs.
    • Intraventricular hemorrhage, or bleeding in the brain.
    • Necrotizing enterocolitis, or inflammation of the intestines.
    • Neonatal sepsis, or blood infection.
    • Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), or abnormal blood flow in the heart.
    • Retinopathy of prematurity, or underdeveloped blood vessels in the eye.

    They note that preemies are also at a higher risk of developmental challenges later in life, including cerebral palsy, hearing and vision problems, learning disabilities, and poor growth. Mothers of preemies are at elevated risk of anxiety, postpartum depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and problems bonding with their baby.

    Who Is At Risk?

    Johns Hopkins Medicine lists the following risk factors for premature births:

    1. Having previously given birth prematurely.
    2. Pregnancies with multiples (twins, triplets, et cetera).
    3. Any history of uterus or cervix problems.

    Additional risk factors listed by Johns Hopkins include: smoking, infections, and not getting prenatal care. They advise pregnant women to “learn about all the risk factors and talk to your obstetrics provider about what you can do to help reduce your risk for preterm labor.”

    Prevention Tactics

    The CDC lists several ways to help prevent premature births:

    • Assuring access to health care before and between pregnancies.
    • Identifying women at risk for preterm delivery and offering effective treatments to prevent preterm birth.
    • Preventing unintended pregnancies.
    • Waiting 18 months or more between pregnancies.
    • Choosing single embryo transfer as appropriate when undergoing in-vitro fertilization because pregnancies with multiples has higher risk of preterm delivery.

    Additionally, Cleveland Clinic recommends a surgical procedure called cervical cerclage, which uses a single stitch to keep the cervix closed until delivery.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-210-6649.

     

     

  • Why it’s Important for Men to Talk About Mental Health

    Mental health issues have become a common topic of discussion since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. What’s not always part of the discussion, though, is the risk mental health issues pose to men. Men are often reluctant to discuss depression and other mental health issues, yet research indicates that men are up to four times more likely than women to die from suicide. In fact, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, men make up about 70 percent of suicide deaths annually. What can be done to stem this tide? The first step is more open communication.

    While over 6 million men in the United States experience symptoms of depression each year, and more than 3 million suffer from anxiety, men are less likely than women to seek mental health support. The reason for this has to do with cultural stigmas. Outdated ideas about gender and mental health can discourage men from seeking treatment, and men are more likely than women to buy into some of these detrimental and destructive points of view. Ideas about men with depression being dangerous or unreliable are among these viewpoints, as is the perception that men should be able to “snap out of” depression and “man up.” It’s no wonder that men who have heard and internalized these thoughts would be reluctant or embarrassed to seek formal treatment for depression.

    Men are also less likely to talk to their peers about issues that are troubling them. While a man may be feeling financial pressure and the stress of supporting a family and balancing home and work life, he’s unlikely to talk about these stressors. This can lead to symptoms of depression that include bad moods, apathy, inability to sleep or sleeping too much, or feelings of anxiousness, restlessness, or racing thoughts. While women often seem sad or down when they’re depressed, men are more likely to display anger or aggression, or self-medicate through substance abuse. It’s important to notice these signs in the men in your life, so that you can encourage them to talk about what’s going on.

    Talking about mental health is important and beneficial. Opening up about stressors can bring a sense of relief and make a person feel less isolated. What’s more, the more people talk about their mental health, the more the topic is normalized, allowing other people to feel they can talk about it too. Talking about mental health can bring out compassion and understanding, not just for others but also for yourself. It also can make a person feel more in control of the situation, once it’s finally out in the open. By beginning to talk, first to close friends and loved ones, then to a health professional, a person can find strategies for coping with mental health issues like depression and anxiety, leading to a healthier life.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we care about all aspects of men’s health. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Children’s Health Symptoms You Should Be Concerned About

    Children often have aches, pains, and other minor symptoms that aren’t really a cause for concern. Parents don’t want to run to the doctor for ever sniffle or tummy ache, but which symptoms are really a cause for concern? It’s good to trust your gut as a parent and seek medical attention if something seems “off.” More specifically, if any of the following symptoms are present, call your pediatrician.

    • A high fever warrants medical care. The definition of “high fever” varies with age, and in a baby younger than three months, anything 100.4°F or higher requires immediate medical care. However, in a child between three and six months old, the threshold for alarm rises to 101°F and in children six months to two years it’s 103° In a child over two years old, acting normal, and seems to be well-hydrated, it’s probably not an urgent matter, but it’s worth calling your pediatrician’s office for advice. Note: a fever that lasts more than five days or doesn’t respond to treatment always warrants a doctor’s appointment.
    • Sometimes a headache is more than “just a headache.” If your child has a headache and a fever, call the doctor. If he or she also has a stiff neck and a rash, seek immediate medical care, because these can be signs of meningitis. A headache in the morning or middle of the night, or a headache with vomiting, may be a migraine or something more serious, so see a doctor right away.
    • Pay attention to rashes and moles. A ring-shaped rash could be Lyme disease, and pinpoint-size spots under the skin could signal a serious condition. Widespread, unexplained bruising may indicate a blood disorder, and other rashes can be signs of allergies. Especially if the child is also having trouble breathing, has a swollen face, is itchy or vomiting, or is agitated or lethargic, see a doctor immediately. Keep an eye on moles, too, doing a monthly check at bath time. Irregularly shaped moles that are different colors, raised, or have ragged borders could be signs of skin cancer. A mole that’s been there since birth has a higher risk of becoming malignant than other moles.
    • Don’t dismiss a stomachache. While some tummy aches are minor complaints, a sudden pain on the lower right side could be a sign of appendicitis. Other symptoms include diarrhea, then abdominal pain, then vomiting, increasing pain, and fever. Another serious condition for children under four is intussusception, a disorder in which one part of the intestine slides into the other. This causes pain in 20 to 60 minute spells, and may be accompanied by fever, vomiting, blood in the stool, or bowel movements with a “currant jelly” appearance. Both illnesses require immediate medical care.
    • Address breathing issues immediately. Did you know that 8 percent of children in the U.S. have asthma? If your child has trouble breathing when exercising, whistles when exhaling, has shortness of breath, or has trouble recovering after a respiratory infection, talk to your pediatrician about asthma. On the other hand, if your child has blue lips or discoloration around the mouth, has trouble breathing and is sucking in the chest and abdomen, or has troublesome sounds coming from the chest and lungs, seek help right away or call 911.
    • Keep an eye on the eyes and ears. If your baby doesn’t respond to loud sounds, schedule a hearing test. With older children, take precautions about noise exposure, keeping devices at half volume or below and limiting time around loud noises, to prevent permanent hearing damage. As to the eyes, notice whether your baby doesn’t seem to focus on objects or your school-aged child is squinting, having trouble reading, or sitting too close to the TV. If you notice these things, schedule a vision screening.
    • Extreme fatigue can signal a problem. Talk to your pediatrician, because it could indicate anemia, malabsorption syndrome, or depression.
    • Urinating frequently or infrequently can each signal a problem. Decreased urination, especially with excessive vomiting or diarrhea, dry mouth and lips, or skin that’s dry or stays bunched when you pinch it, could signal serious dehydration. Increased urination, especially with excessive thirst, extreme hunger, weight loss, or fatigue, could signal type 1 diabetes.
    • Recognize serious injuries. Kids often fall and hurt themselves, but how do you know if an injury requires medical attention? If your child is less than 6 months old, always see a doctor. If there’s confusion, loss of consciousness, or other neurological changes, vomits after falling, or seems to have damage to the body, like a broken bone, it’s a medical emergency. The same holds true for a cut that gapes open as wide as a cotton swab or doesn’t stop bleeding when you apply pressure.

    A healthy life for your child begins in the womb, and at the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • What is hyperemesis gravidarum?

    If you follow the British royal family, you may recall that Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, experienced hyperemesis gravidarum during all three of her pregnancies. In fact, during her first pregnancy the problem was so severe that she was briefly hospitalized! Reading this news a few years back, you may not have paid much attention. If your pregnant partner is suddenly throwing up more than seems normal, though, you may be getting nervous. Is it morning sickness, or could it be hyperemesis gravidarum?

    It’s important to note that nausea is very common during pregnancy, and typically harmless. It’s uncomfortable, to be sure, but fortunately, it usually resolves by the end of the first trimester, although some people experience it for up to 20 weeks. Nausea during the first trimester, sometimes accompanied by vomiting, is known as morning sickness. It doesn’t usually cause dehydration, though it can leave a woman fatigued, with appetite loss, and it can cause her to have trouble with her normal daily activities.

    Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is not nearly as common. In fact, it only happens in .5 to 2 percent of pregnancies. With this condition, the nausea won’t go away, and the vomiting is so severe that the person can’t keep any foods or fluids down and becomes dehydrated. These symptoms can be debilitating, typically start in the first 6 weeks of pregnancy, and can cause fatigue that lasts for weeks or months. It’s a major concern not just because of the dehydration, but because it prevents proper weight gain during pregnancy. A woman with hyperemesis gravidarum can lose more than 5 percent of her body weight because of the nausea and vomiting.

    A woman is more at risk for HG if she has a family history of the condition, is pregnant for the first time, or is carrying multiples. Trophoblastic disease, a condition that occurs when there’s abnormal cell growth in the uterus, can also cause HG. There’s no way to prevent hyperemesis gravidarum, but it can be treated. Depending on the severity of the symptoms, treatments vary. Mild cases might be treated with natural nausea treatment, dietary changes, rest, or antacids. In some cases, acupressure or homeopathic treatments can be helpful, but it’s important for anyone with HG to talk to a doctor and refrain from self-medicating. More serious cases of HG require hospitalization. In the hospital, treatments include intravenous (IV) fluids, tube feeding, and medication. If you have any concerns during pregnancy, calling your doctor for advice is always a good choice to promote a healthy pregnancy.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping to start families by facilitating healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

     

  • Healthy Foods to Feed Growing Kids

    Kids between the ages of two and 12 grow very quickly. For them to stay healthy, they need the right diet, with foods that provide protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins to promote proper development. This can be challenging, because young children are often picky eaters. It’s important to be consistent, offering healthy options and setting a good example. To foster appropriate development of mental and motor skills, offer grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and protein, including these top picks from dieticians.

    • Berries: Strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries are delicious and packed with vitamin C, antioxidants, and phytonutrients. These nutrients help boost the immune system and protect cells from damage. They’re easy to incorporate in a child’s diet, too, whether on their own, in pancakes or muffins, or as toppings for yogurt, ice cream, or cereal.
    • Fruit: Apples, pears, oranges, banana, mango, and kiwi are all excellent choices, tasty and full of vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and plant polyphenols. Kids can snack on them, or you can incorporate them into baked goods and smoothies or use them to top oatmeal or yogurt.
    • Eggs: A great source of choline, protein, and vitamins, eggs are good for brain development. They’re easy to prepare, boiled, fried, or scrambled, or added to soup, oatmeal, gravy, rice, and noodles, or in desserts like custard.
    • Dairy: Cow’s milk and cheese contain calcium, phosphorous, vitamin D, and protein, for healthy bones and muscles. For children under two, full-fat milk is the best option, for extra energy. Milk is easy to drink at meals, have with cereal or cookies, or blend with fruit for smoothies. Cheese is a good snack, especially mild varieties like mozzarella or American cheese. Serve slices, cubes, or strings, or melt cheese on toast or pizza, or sprinkle grated cheese over noodles.
    • Colorful Vegetables: Make a game of seeing how many different colors your child can eat, because brightly colored fruits and vegetables have powerful antioxidants. Root vegetables like carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, purple potatoes, potatoes, and parsnips are loaded with potassium, magnesium, fiber, beta-carotene, iron, and vitamins A, B and C, among other nutrients. Green vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, and arugula, along with cauliflower, provide folate, fiber, phytonutrients, and vitamins A, C, and K. These nutrients strengthen the immune system, lower inflammation, and can even reduce the risk of cancer. Try different vegetables, prepared different ways, in stews, mashed, baked into goodies, baked into chips, or raw, with your child’s favorite dip.
    • Legumes: Legumes, including beans, peas, and lentils, provide fiber, vitamin B, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and protein. And guess what? Peanuts are also a legume, so your child’s favorite peanut butter is full of nutrition plus healthy monounsaturated fats. Make sure when you choose peanut butter, though, that you pick a brand with no added sugar, palm oil, or partially hydrogenated fats. You can probably think of several ways to feed your child peanut butter, but other legumes are versatile, too. Add them to soups, stews, chilis, casseroles, and salads, serve as side dishes, or blend them and use them as a base for baked goods and sauces.
    • Whole grains: Avoid processed white flour, opting for whole wheat flour instead, to reap the benefits of the naturally contained zinc, iron, copper, magnesium, vitamins E and B, phytonutrients, and antioxidants, as well as the fiber that can help maintain digestive health. Remember, whole grains include brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, bulgur wheat, barley, oats, millet, and corn, so you have a lot of options.
    • Meat and Fish: Great sources of protein, these foods provide other important nutrients, too. Beef and chicken contain important vitamins, like vitamins A, B, D, E, and K, as well as minerals like iron, zinc, magnesium, and phosphorus. Chicken is higher in vitamins, while beef has more minerals. Fish has omega-3 fatty acids, for eye, brain, and nerve development.
    • Seeds: Work sunflower, pumpkin, hemp, chia, and flaxseeds into your child’s diet for a healthy dose of vitamin E, minerals, fiber, protein, and healthy fats.

    A healthy life for your child begins in the womb, and at the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • The Link Between Stress and Men’s Reproductive Health

    When you’re trying to conceive a child, you’ll try just about anything to make it happen. Men trying to improve their reproductive health often wear looser clothing, avoid hot tubs and laptops, and change their diets to improve their chances at conception. It can get pretty stressful, which is not great, because stress negatively impact on your reproductive health as well.

    It makes sense that stress would be bad for your reproductive health, because it’s bad for your health in general. Stress, a reaction to mental or emotional pressure, can cause biochemical, physiological, and behavioral changes or responses. It’s known to disrupt immune function, exacerbate bowel issues, cause heart trouble, and contribute to cancer. Now, several studied have linked stress with a reduction in male fertility and the quality of semen.

    Stress can cause erectile dysfunction, which is a major cause of infertility. Researchers don’t yet fully understand, though, what it is about stress that impacts semen quality. It may cause the release of hormones that decrease testosterone and sperm production, or it could be that oxidative stress is the problem. One study indicated that work stress adversely affected sperm count and semen volume, and another showed that prolonged stress, such as the stress experienced by soldiers, reduced sperm motility. Other studied confirm the correlation between stress and semen quality, even if we don’t know exactly how it happens.

    Fortunately, there are steps you can take to reduce your stress. Even though stress can feel like it’s beyond your control, you can alleviate it in the following ways.

    • Take control of your problems. If something is overwhelming you, try breaking it down into smaller, more manageable tasks so it’s easier to tackle.
    • Learn to say no. It’s easy to keep taking on tasks and adding to your workload, and this may be your way of trying to be in control of your problems. However, it’s smarter to delegate than to do too much, and to say no when you’re overwhelmed. If you’re often working overtime, for instance, be proactive about it, speaking to your boss and making a point to work fewer hours.
    • Spend time with your favorite people. It’s easy for men to become isolated, especially when they’re dealing with something as stressful as infertility. Make the time to be with friends and family, enjoying the company of loved ones without focusing on your worries. It can also be helpful to talk about your struggles with infertility, and if you’re having trouble talking to people you know about it, consider joining a support group. In a group where people are going through similar experiences, you can share and feel truly understood.
    • Get some exercise. Regular exercise can reduce stress and anxiety, as well as helping to regulate your sleep patterns, which also alleviates stress. You don’t have to overdo it; yoga, walking, or a light gym workout are enough to be beneficial. Make exercise a priority, scheduling like you would any other appointment, and invite a friend to join you. Above all, do something you enjoy that’s sustainable in the long run.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we are committed to helping men overcome reproductive issues and start healthy families. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Fun Activities to Do with Your Kids this Summer

    Summer is finally here! Long, lazy days stretch ahead, as kids get out of school and look forward to relaxation and fun. While children revel in excited anticipation, parents collectively wonder: what will we do with them? Wonder no more, we’ve got a list of fun ideas to help you entertain your crew all summer long.

    • Get outside for some old-school activities. What did you love doing in the summer when you were a child? Chances are, your offspring will find these things just as fun and appealing. Ride bikes together, create a masterpiece with sidewalk chalk, climb a tree, go to the playground, fly a kite, blow bubbles, play with water balloons, or go fishing. If you have enough friends and family members available, try some outdoor sports, like badminton, kickball, softball, or capture the flag.
    • Make the most of your own back yard. What’s more fun than a backyard campout, complete with s’mores? You can also host a backyard movie night, inviting friends over for big screen fun. Set up a slip-and-slide, play in the sprinklers, or have a night-time game of hide and seek.
    • Cook up some fun. Cooking with kids can be fun and rewarding, because it teaches them life skills and may even take dinner off of your to-do list. Try a make your own pizza night, let the kids cook plan and cook dinner, teach them to make your favorite childhood treat, or make ice cream together.
    • Get artsy-craftsy. The possibilities for this are nearly endless and can occupy kids for some time. Paint rocks, craft with pipe cleaners, or get a roll of paper and make a summer mural. Set up an easel and let them paint with squirt guns, get out some dress-up clothes and have a photo shoot, or do something simple like stringing beads or pressing flowers.
    • Look for local resources. Your library probably has story times, reading contests, and other events to make the summer special. State parks often host day camps or workshops, and community centers have their own array of activities. There are also local parks for picnicking, farmer’s markets for shopping, and concerts, fairs, and sporting events to enjoy together. Even if you’re just heading to the duck pond or having lunch at a diner, there’s fun in exploring your local area.
    • Get wet! Visit a splash park, a local pool, or a nearby body of water for some splashy fun. Have a water gun fight or play outside in the rain. Being soaked to the skin can be a welcome and joyous respite from the summer heat.
    • Spend some time in nature. Get into gardening, maybe planting herbs, vegetables, or flowers, or perhaps a butterfly garden. Make a DIY bird feeders and quietly watch your feathered friends enjoy it or spread blankets on the lawn and look for shapes in the clouds or do some stargazing. Find a new trail to hike, visit a wildlife refuge, or go berry picking.
    • Plan for rainy day fun. Summer is known for sunny days, but there’s plenty of rain as well. When you’re cooped up with nowhere to go, try playing board games, making a pillow fort, or doing puzzles. Feeling restless? Have a dance party in the living room! You might even want to plan ahead and have science experiments or another exciting activity on hand to make the day fun even when the rain hits.
    • Do something for someone else. One of the most meaningful things you can do with your kids at any time of year is to volunteer in support of someone else’s needs. Even little kids can help clean the local park, bring canned goods to a food pantry, or help assemble hygiene kits or meals for those in need. Look to your place of worship for opportunities or check out volunteer organizations like the Red Cross and the United Way.
    • Work in some education. Sure, school’s out for summer, but it’s great to keep kids’ minds active. Read a chapter book together, or join a summer reading club. Get a book of riddles or play some brainteaser games. Have your kids keep a journal or write and illustrate a comic book. Take everyday opportunities to practice math and science skills, like baking or exploring outside. Whatever you can do to keep them learning will make the transition back to school easier in the fall.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • What to Consider Before Having a Vasectomy Reversed

    A vasectomy is a fairly straightforward procedure, an outpatient operation with few complications. A vasectomy reversal, on the other hand, is complicated. While today’s vasectomy reversals are much more effective than the reversals of the past, there’s a lot to consider before you decide if that’s the right option for you.

    What makes this procedure complex? It involves microsurgery, in which the surgeon reconnects the vas deferens, the tubes that carry sperm from the testicle into the semen. This is a very delicate operation, which must be performed by a skilled surgeon, experienced in using a high-powered microscope to complete these surgeries. Here are some other things to think about before you decide on a vasectomy reversal.

    • Know whether you’re a good candidate. The good news is that no matter how much time has passed since you had a vasectomy, you can still have a vasectomy reversal. A skilled surgeon with the right expertise can successfully reverse a vasectomy that was performed 15 or 20 years ago and, in some cases, even longer. If you’ve had other groin surgeries since, though, that could reduce your chances for a successful reversal. The among of tissue removed during your vasectomy also makes a difference in how the procedure is performed. If the vasectomy was straightforward and there’s enough tissue left for a successful reversal, the procedure that’s done is called a vasovasostomy. In this procedure, the surgeon sews together the severed ends of each tube. If a vasovasostomy can’t be done with a good chance of success, the doctor will opt for a vasoepididymostomy, in which the vas deferens is attached directly to the epididymis, the small organ at the back of the testicle that holds the sperm. In rare cases, a reversal is not possible, but that doesn’t mean there’s no possibility of reproductive success. Using another microscopic procedure, the surgeon can remove sperm from the epididymis for in vitro fertilization (IVF).
    • Understand that there are some risks. In some cases, bleeding inside the scrotum can lead to a hematoma, a collection of blood that causes painful swelling. There’s also the risk of infection at the surgery site, but this is uncommon, as is persistent pain after the surgery. One thing that is not a risk of vasectomy reversal is sexual dysfunction. While this is a common concern, erectile function will not be damaged by this procedure.
    • Keep your expectations realistic. While the success rates of vasectomy reversals are good, that doesn’t mean that a couple will conceive immediately. It can take time for sperm to return to ejaculate after the surgery, and while some couples achieve pregnancy within several weeks after the procedure, it can take up to one year for others.
    • Choose a surgeon based on qualifications, not cost. Because of the nature of this surgery, it’s crucial that you find an experienced microsurgeon with good vasectomy reversal success rates. While you can sometimes find “low cost” vasectomies online, budget should not be your primary concern in such an important decision. Check your surgeon’s qualifications carefully before deciding on the person who will perform this intricate procedure.

    If you decide a vasectomy reversal is right for you, depend on the experts at Center for Vasectomy Reversal. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Questions to Ask Your PCP During Your Checkups

    If you’re taking care of yourself, you probably go in for an annual checkup with your primary care provider (PCP). You might find, though, that you end up feeling rushed and a little bit overwhelmed during the appointment. You may not end up learning as much as you need to know because you forget the questions you wanted to ask your doctor. We suggest that you make a list ahead of time, and consider asking these questions next time you see your PCP.

    • Should I change my diet? Eating sensibly is a good idea for everyone, so stick to nutrient-dense foods and try to avoid things that are over-processed, calorie-laden, or full of sugar. If you have a health condition like pre-diabetes or diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol, your doctor may recommend specific dietary measures for you to take.
    • How much do I need to exercise? It’s recommended for most people to get 30 minutes of exercise, at least five days a week. The amount and type of exercise that’s right for you is something your doctor can help you to determine.
    • How much sleep do I need? Sleep is extremely important, and many health conditions are linked to poor sleep, including diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, excess weight, and mood disorders. Younger men who don’t get enough sleep can also suffer from low testosterone. Your doctor can advise you on the amount of sleep you need, but in general, good sleep habits include going to bed and waking at the same time each day, exercising regularly, avoiding caffeine in the afternoon and evening, avoiding large meals and alcohol at night, and using the bedroom only for sleeping and sex.
    • Which tests and screenings should I have? At your physical, you’ll probably have your weight, temperature, and blood pressure checked, and the doctor will examine you, listening to your heart and lungs and checking your reflexes. Your doctor may also order some screenings, like cholesterol, blood sugar, and iron levels, and possibly heart function, using an EKG. You may also have a prostate check, which is necessary to protect your health. Talk to your doctor about any other screenings that may be necessary.
    • Am I at increased risk for any illnesses or conditions? Talk to your doctor about your family history, and be honest about your lifestyle habits. Your doctor will be able to help you determine whether you’re at increased risk for things like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease.
    • Should I be concerned with my bowel health? Everyone experiences problems like constipation or diarrhea from time to time, but if these conditions are chronic or sudden and intense, you may be suffering from a condition more serious than an upset stomach. Talk to your doctor, because you may be suffering from something like irritable bowel syndrome, food intolerance, or celiac disease, but it could also be colon cancer. Getting to the root cause of your problem, then, is crucial.
    • Is depression a risk for me? About 6 million men in the United States struggle with depression, but many of them don’t ask for help. In fact, they often do not realize they’re suffering from depression but simply report symptoms like fatigue, loss of appetite, restlessness, or a loss of interest in their usual activities. Staying on top of your mental health is important, not least because men die from suicide at four times the rate of women. If you’re feeling stressed or anxious, talk to your doctor.
    • What kinds of cancer should concern me? Men have a greater lifetime risk of cancer than women, and some cancers are particularly likely to affect men. Lung cancer and colorectal cancer, for instance, occur more frequently in men than women. Melanoma affects both genders equally, but is the most common type of cancer in men over 50. Of course, men can also get prostate, testicular, and penile cancer. Talk to your doctor about screening for and protecting against cancer.
    • How is my sexual health? Sexual health is important because it impacts your overall health. If you’re suffering from erectile dysfunction or you have any symptoms that could indicate a sexually transmitted infection, talk to your doctor about it. There’s also the controversial issue of male menopause, in which the decline in testosterone as men age can cause symptoms like hot flashes, insomnia, low sex drive, loss of energy, and depression.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.