• How to Baby Proof your Home

    When you are about to have a baby, it can be alarming to look at all the hazards in your home. Your space, which has always seemed benign or even inviting, may now seem like a virtual deathtrap, with danger lurking everywhere. Relax! It’s not as bad as it may seem, and babyproofing is not too overwhelming if you take it step by step.

    • First, think about the reasons behind babyproofing. It’s important to keep hazards out of the way of children, not just to keep the little ones safe, but also to make it easier to parent. It’s no fun to constantly say “no”, but you can set yourself and your child up for success by creating an environment that’s comfortable and safe.
    • Look for major hazards throughout the house. Anything broken, paint that’s chipped or peeling, wallpaper that’s coming unstuck- fix those things. Make sure your water heater is set below 120° F, and that your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are in good working order. If you live in a home built before 1978, check for lead paint; hire a lead-safe contractor to fix it if you find it. Cover electrical outlets and secure any piece of furniture or heavy electronic item that could tip, using safety straps or anchoring things to the wall. If you use window blinds, consider choosing cordless blinds. If your existing blinds have cords, use cord safety wraps.
    • Keep small children out of the bathroom. Babies and toddlers are drawn to water, which makes toilets, sinks, and bathtubs hazardous. Additionally, bathrooms tend to have cleaning supplies and medications. The best course of action is to secure the cabinets, drawers, and toilets with child locks and then put a doorknob cover on the outer handle.
    • Kitchens need special attention. Install magnetic childproofing locks in the cabinets, secure drawers, and lock hazards like liquor cabinets and medicine cabinets. Use stove knob covers and turn the handles of pots and pans inward so a child can’t grab them and pull down hot food. Store cleaning supplies, including laundry detergent, out of children’s reach. Put non-skid pads under rugs and find a way to contain children while you’re cooking.
    • Do a sweep of the whole house. In the nursery, make sure your crib is safe with crib rails at the appropriate level and no toys, blankets, or bumpers in the crib. Choose a toy box that’s safe, with no heavy lid, and put finger guards on door hinges. In the living areas, pad corners of furniture, skip tablecloths because of the danger of kids tugging on them, and install window guards.

    At Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping to create healthy, happy families. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

     

  • Vasectomy Reversal Myths

    As you contemplate whether a vasectomy reversal is right for you, you may stumble upon common myths about this surgical procedure. Dispel any misunderstandings before you meet with a microsurgeon about reversing your vasectomy.

    Myth: A vasectomy reversal is as straightforward as a vasectomy.

    Almost any doctor can perform a vasectomy, a short and relatively simple surgery that requires minimal training. However, a correctly performed vasectomy reversal is an advanced, technically challenging microsurgery lasting two to three hours. You should only trust an expert microsurgeon with years of successful reversals to increase the chance of success and lower the risk of complications.

    Myth: All vasectomy reversals have the same chance of success.

    Talk to your surgeon about what could affect the success of your surgery before deciding to have a vasectomy reversal. Factors may include:

    • Sperm count and mobility
    • Any development of anti-sperm antibodies
    • Scar tissue following surgery
    • Fertility of your female partner
    • Length of time since your vasectomy

    Myth: A vasectomy reversal must be performed within 10 years to have any chance of success.

    If you had your vasectomy less than five years ago, there is a greater than 95 percent chance of sperm in the ejaculate. Surgeries performed five to 10 years ago have about a 90 percent chance, and if 10 or more years have elapsed, there’s an 80 to 90 percent chance. Experienced surgeons can perform successful reversals over 20 years after a vasectomy. (Note: pregnancy rates are lower than the percentages given here and depend on numerous factors.)

    Myth: Pursuing IVF is better than having a vasectomy reversal.

    While in vitro fertilization is a viable infertility treatment, it should not be your first choice. IVF costs three to five times more than vasectomy reversal surgery, and it comes with serious risks to the mother and baby—all with no guarantee of a successful pregnancy. With the costs, risks, and success rates in mind, a reversal with natural conception makes more sense for most couples.

    Myth: Some vasectomy methods are not reversible.

    It is extremely rare for a vasectomy to be performed in such a way that a microsurgeon cannot reverse it. The only time this can happen is if the original surgeon removes too much of the vas deferens, the tube that transports sperm from the testes to the urethra. In this case, there is nothing to reattach, and the reversal cannot be done. Again, this is very uncommon and can be ruled out prior to surgery via a physical exam.

    Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in microscopic infertility procedures. If you have decided to pursue parenthood, we can help. Dr. Green has completed hundreds of vasectomy reversal surgeries and takes great pride in his remarkable success rates. We’ll discuss your surgical options, costs, and the chance of success based on your specific situation. To learn more, please call our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-894-6428 or schedule a free consultation online.

  • Everything You Need to Know About Vasoepididymostomy

    Vasoepididymostomy is a corrective treatment for epididymal obstruction, or blockage near the testicular end of the vas deferens. The procedure surgically connects the vas deferens to the epididymis. A successful outcome relies on the microsurgical skills and extensive experience of the physician performing the procedure.

    What is the Epididymis?

    The epididymis is a tightly coiled tube situated behind the testis. Sperm leave the testicle and enter this tube, where they learn to “swim,” a skill necessary to fertilize a female’s egg. The epididymis is only 200 microns wide, or twice the diameter of a human hair, so operating on it requires incredible precision. From here, sperm empty into the vas deferens, which takes them to the ejaculation ducts. Sperm then pass into the urethra in the penis prior to ejaculation.

    What Causes Epididymal Obstruction?

    Several underlying problems could cause a blockage in the epididymis, including:

    • Congenital abnormalities, such as the absence of the distal portion of the epididymis and absence of the vas deferens
    • Inflammation of the epididymis (epididymitis)
    • Young’s syndrome
    • Accidental injury from a prior surgery
    • Side effect of a past vasectomy, especially if the procedure was performed over 10 years ago

    What are the Advantages of Vasoepididymostomy Over IVF/ICSI?

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are two relatively recent advances in reproductive medicine. IVF is the process of extracting eggs from a woman and sperm from a man, and then combining them manually in a laboratory dish. The resulting embryo is then transferred to the woman’s uterus. ICSI is a type of IVF that involves injecting a single sperm cell into an egg.

    Here’s why treating epididymal obstruction with vasoepididymostomy could be preferred over IVF/ICSI:

    • If the treatment is successful, couples can have children through natural intercourse.
    • IVF is an expensive, intense procedure, especially for the female partner.
    • There are no ethical issues surrounding
    • Pregnancy rates (11 to 56 percent) are comparable with or better than IVF/ICSI.
    • Insurance often covers the cost to correct epididymal obstruction but may not cover IVF/ICSI.
    • Sperm can be collected during the procedure and cryopreserved for future IVF attempts if vasoepididymostomy is not successful.

    Could Vasoepididymostomy be Right for Me?

    Your doctor may recommend this procedure if you have the following:

    • Male infertility
    • Active sperm production in the testis
    • Signs of an obstructed epididymis, including thick fluid expressed from the testicular side of the vas deferens following a vasectomy

    Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in male infertility microsurgeries, including vasoepididymostomy. Whether you’re simply struggling with male infertility or you want to reverse a prior vasectomy so you can have children, we can help. If you require vasoepididymostomy alongside a vasectomy reversal, we can perform this additional procedure at the same time for no extra cost. To learn more, please call our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-894-6428 or schedule a free consultation online.

  • Can Old Vasectomies Be Reversed?

    Vasectomy reversal has come a long way over the past several decades, and the technology has improved so much that the procedure has a high success rate. There is some concern, though, about vasectomies that are over 15 years old. Can they be reversed? How does the success rate differ between these “old” vasectomies and more recent surgeries?

    Good news: older vasectomies are almost as easy to reverse as newer ones. Most men continue to produce sperm throughout their lives, so fatherhood is possible late in life. Sometimes an older vasectomy can develop a blockage in addition to the vasectomy, which makes it more complicated to restore sperm flow. Fortunately, advances in microsurgical techniques mean this is not an insurmountable obstacle.

    If there’s more than one point of obstruction blocking the flow of sperm, the surgeon may choose to perform an epididymovasostomy. While a typical vasectomy reversal involves removing the blockage and reattaching the severed ends of the vas, an epididymovasostomy is more complex. In this procedure the original blockage is removed, just as in the vasovasostomy, and the semen is examined for sperm. If sperm are not present, it indicates a second blockage. In this case, the vas deferens is connected to the epididymis, rather than simply having the ends connected back together.

    New research indicates that the rates of moving ejaculated sperm counts after a reversal are close in old and new vasectomies. The younger vasectomies have an 88 percent chance of having a healthy sperm count, while the older ones have a 65 percent chance. The sperm counts in the two groups were identical, averaging 55 million sperm. This is encouraging, because it means that even old vasectomy reversals have a good chance of restoring fertility.

    Of course, a successful reversal does not guarantee pregnancy. There are many factors that come into play in fertility. If a couple cannot conceive after a vasectomy has been successfully reversed and the sperm count is good, there may be an undiagnosed fertility issue with the female partner. The most important factor in the vasectomy reversal itself is the skill of the surgical team. Microsurgery is extremely complicated, and success requires the work of a skillful and experienced surgeon. A surgeon who is well-versed in vasectomy reversal and proficient at microsurgical techniques can often successfully reverse a vasectomy that’s 20 years old or older.

    If you’re interested in reversing your vasectomy and you’re looking for an experienced professional surgical team, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here for you. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

     

  • How late is too late to have children?

    There’s a lot of talk about women and their biological clocks, but you don’t often hear all that much about men in that context. Why is that? Do men have a biological clock? Men can father children at much later ages than women can get pregnant, it’s true, but should they? Are there risks inherent in being an older father? How late is too late to have children?

    In fact, reproductive aging is a reality for both men and women. Just because men don’t hit menopause, that doesn’t mean there are no consequences associated with their advancing age. Both men and women experience declining fertility and hormone levels as they get older. Worse, the risk of health complications for the child also increases. When a father is older, the couple is likely to have more difficulty conceiving, a higher risk of miscarriage, and a higher potential for health problems in the baby.

    Women’s reproductive capability begins to decline around age 35, while men experience a more gradual decline that begins around 40. When a woman does conceive after age 35, it’s referred to as a geriatric pregnancy, and there’s a lot of focus on what could go wrong. Over 35, women are at higher risk of miscarriage, gestational diabetes, chromosome issues, high blood pressure, low birth weight, and caesarean delivery. Perhaps because the woman is the one carrying the child and going to the prenatal appointments, this is all well-known and well-established. However, research indicates that the genetic quality of a man’s sperm degrades as he ages as well.

    Unlike women, who have a finite number of eggs, men produce sperm throughout their lifetimes. The existing sperm replicates its DNA and splits, over and over, until late in a man’s life. Unfortunately, all that splitting means the DNA can change a little bit every time the process is repeated. The result is that the number of genetic mutations in a man’s sperm increases steadily and gradually as he ages. These mutations make it more likely to conceive a child with conditions like schizophrenia or autism.

    The good news is that even for older parents, the chance of having a child with a genetic disorder is still low. Understanding the facts about male fertility should, however, encourage people to consider beginning their families earlier or taking measures like egg freezing and sperm banking to allow them to postpone conception. Of course, there are also advantages to being an older parent. When people take time to establish themselves before they have kids, they’re better educated and more financially stable when they do start their families.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people build their families. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

  • What to Expect after your Vasectomy Reversal

    If you’re preparing for a vasectomy reversal, you’ve already been through the experience of undergoing a vasectomy. Thinking about the recovery period after that procedure can give you a reasonably accurate idea of the discomfort you’ll have after your vasectomy reversal. Fortunately, the recovery period for this minimally invasive procedure is brief.

    We perform each vasectomy reversal as an outpatient procedure, at an accredited Surgery Center with a Board-Certified anesthesiologist. You’ll go home shortly after your procedure, but you’ll need someone to drive you because of the after-effects of the anesthesia. Because you’ve been anesthetized, you may experience generalized aches, fatigue, a sore throat, or nausea, but these symptoms should go away within 24 hours.

    For many men, the discomfort after a vasectomy reversal is not as bad as they’d expected it to be. The day after surgery is usually the worst in terms of pain and swelling, and that’s also when your doctor will remove your drains. Most of the time, the pain only lasts for 24-48 hours, although in some cases, men report pain for up to a week. This pain can be alleviated with oral pain relievers, and ice packs will help reduce scrotal swelling. It’s best to stay off your feet and keep your legs elevated in these first few days, applying the ice packs for 10 minutes every half hour while you’re awake. Don’t get the incision wet for the first 48 hours, and follow your doctor’s post-operative instructions carefully. It’s important to wear snug scrotal support for 30 days after your procedure, to keep pressure off of the incision.

    It surprises many men to learn that they can go back to work within a week and, in some cases, as few as two days. If your job is extremely active or requires heavy lifting, you may need to take a little longer before heading back. You won’t be ready for intense physical activity just yet, though you’ll be able to resume most of your normal activities in three to four weeks. You’ll need to refrain from sexual activity for at least three weeks after the procedure, but this probably won’t be difficult because of your discomfort during the healing process.

    About three weeks after your vasectomy reversal, you’ll be asked to provide a semen sample for analysis. While the return of sperm to semen does not guarantee conception, it’s still good news that vasectomy reversals have a high success rate for returning sperm. Additionally, success in achieving pregnancy after the procedure ranges from about 40 to over 90 percent.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we pride ourselves on providing optimal surgical results and uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

     

  • Different Vasectomy Reversal Surgical Options

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, you should be aware that there are different surgical options used to complete the procedure. Vasectomy reversal is complex and detailed, requiring expertise and focus from the surgeon. That’s why it’s important to find a surgeon with the experience and knowledge necessary to choose the right one for you and perform it skillfully. Which procedure will you require, and what will it entail?

    The most straightforward type of vasectomy reversal is the vasovasostomy. This is what most men can expect when they go in for a vasectomy reversal. In this procedure, the scar tissue from the vasectomy is removed and the ends above and below the portion that had been blocked are sutured back together. The opening being reconnected is extremely small, between .7 mm and .4 mm in diameter, so extreme skill is required to perform this procedure.

    For some men, the time frame since their vasectomy might be so long or the blockage from the vasectomy might be so low that a vasovasostomy is not possible. In these cases, a vasoepididymostomy is performed. This is a much more technically challenging surgery, requiring microsurgical expertise, and only the most experienced, specially-trained surgeons can perform it. In this procedure, the upper end of the vas deferens is connected to a tubule of the epididymis, the structure that connects the testicle to the vas deferens. The opening connected in this procedure is about 1/10th of the one made for the vasovasostomy, so it’s a much more delicate microsurgery. In addition to the difficulty of the procedure being high, the success rate is lower than that of the vasovasostomy. For these reasons, this procedure is only done if absolutely necessary.

    There is a third done for men who have had a vasectomy and now wish to father a child. It’s called microscopic epididymal sperm aspiration (MESA), and it’s only an option for those couples who are choosing to undergo in vitro fertilization. Sperm aspiration, like the two kinds of vasectomy reversal, is done using an operating microscope. This enables the surgeon to successfully obtain sperm directly from the epididymis without contamination from blood and bodily fluids. Using the operating microscope, the surgeon is able to see the epididymal tubules clearly, so the success rates are extremely high and there’s very little risk of damaging adjacent structures.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we pride ourselves on providing optimal surgical results and uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

  • Reasons Why Men Get Vasectomy Reversals

    As many as 500,000 vasectomies are performed in the United States each year, making it a fairly common procedure. It’s not surprising that the numbers would be high, since a vasectomy is a simple outpatient procedure. Interestingly, between six and ten percent of men who opt for a vasectomy later change their minds and have the vasectomy reversed. Why do men get vasectomy reversals? And are those reversals successful?

    The reasons for a vasectomy reversal are personal and varied. Maybe the man thought he didn’t want children, or didn’t want any more children, but then he met a new partner and changed his mind. Maybe he and his wife had a child and decided they didn’t want any more, but then that child died, and the loss prompted them to try for another. Maybe the family’s financial resources have increased and having a new family member seems more doable. On the other hand, some men choose vasectomy reversals because the vasectomy has caused pain and other negative symptoms. In that case, regardless of whether or not he wants children, a man might have a vasectomy reversal to alleviate pain.

    Most vasectomies are reversible. In fact, vasectomies can be reversed up to 20 years after the initial procedure. It should be noted, however, that the longer a man waits for a vasectomy reversal, the lower the chances are that the procedure will be successful. In general, vasectomy reversals are most likely to be successful if they’re performed by a surgeon trained in microsurgical techniques and the use of a surgical microscope. The chances of success are also increased when the surgeon has done the procedure many times and does it regularly.

    There are two types of vasectomy reversals. The simplest and most common is called a vasovasostomy. The surgeon, using a surgical microscope, reconnects the sides of the vas deferens, which was severed in the vasectomy. Sometimes, however, this procedure isn’t possible. In that case, a vasoepididymostomy is performed, in which the vas deferens is connected to the epididymis, the area above the testes where the sperm is stored. In most cases, the vasovasostomy is the more successful of these two procedures.

    Of course, a successful vasectomy reversal does not always result in the successful conception of a child. Many other factors come into play when trying to achieve a pregnancy, including the type of procedure and the age and fertility of the man’s partner. After a vasectomy reversal, pregnancy rates range from about 30 to over 90 percent.

    If you’re interested in reversing your vasectomy and you’re looking for an experienced professional surgical team, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here for you. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

  • How to Help your Body Heal Faster After Having a Vasectomy Reversal Procedure

    A vasectomy reversal is a safe, outpatient procedure with a high success rate. However, as with any surgical procedure, patients who undergo vasectomy reversal need to take care afterward, to help their bodies heal. Full healing can take several weeks, and it’s important to follow your surgeon’s instructions for aftercare. Here are some tips on how to help your recovery go smoothly.

    • First, commit to at least a week of rest. Try to take off work, and just spend the week relaxing. If you can’t fully stop working, it’s ok to take calls and emails while resting on a sofa. Your everyday activities should be limited. You can get yourself a drink, for instance, or make a snack like toast, but avoid cooking full meals. You can drive, but don’t lift anything. You absolutely cannot go to the gym.
    • Be aware that it may take more than a week. Especially if you have a physically demanding job, you’ll need to take two weeks off work. In fact, with any job other than a desk job, it’s better to take the full two weeks. After four or five weeks you should be essentially back to normal, though you should still try to avoid heavy lifting.
    • You won’t be able to exercise for a month. Your body needs rest to recover, so you should not do any exercise beyond walking for the first month after your operation. Even though it’s a fairly gentle exercise, swimming is not advised. This is because chlorine can damage open or newly healed wounds.
    • Postpone sex for no fewer than two weeks, and preferably longer. Some patients can resume intercourse after two to three weeks, but for most, it’s better to wait a little longer. After four or five weeks, most patients can comfortably have sex again. It’s crucial not to rush things, because you can undo your surgery, and then you’ll have to go through the whole process again.
    • The right diet can promote healing. Eating nutrient-dense foods like fruits and vegetables, eggs, healthy fats, and protein-rich foods can help your body recover more quickly.
    • It can take several months for pregnancy to be possible after vasectomy reversal. After six weeks, the doctor will perform a semen analysis to see if sperm has successfully returned to the ejaculate. By about three months, men typically have viable sperm. However, it may not be possible to achieve pregnancy for several months, so it’s important to be patient.

    If you’ve changed your mind about the size of your family and you’re interested in reversing your vasectomy, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal can help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

  • How to Prepare For your Vasectomy Reversal

    If you’re having a vasectomy reversal, it’s normal to feel some anxiety before the procedure. Any type of surgery can be intimidating, and vasectomy is certainly a serious undertaking. The procedure itself, however, is quite safe. It’s performed in an outpatient setting and has a high success rate. There are some things you can do to prepare for your vasectomy reversal that will help the entire process go more smoothly.

    • Shake off the nerves. Trust your medical team and trust yourself. You’ve made an educated decision, choosing a reliable and experienced surgeon, and you can be confident in the choice you’ve made. Learn as much as you can about the procedure ahead of time, prepare yourself and your home for your recovery, and then rest in the knowledge that you’re in good hands.
    • Watch what you put into your body. Stop smoking at least six weeks before your surgery, and don’t smoke for at least a month after the procedure. Better yet, don’t smoke at all! Avoid alcohol for a week before surgery, and steer clear of medications like aspirin for 48 hours before your procedure. Your doctor will advise you of any other medications to avoid, but the general rule is to stop taking blood thinners and anti-inflammatory medication. You will need to abstain from food and drink from midnight the night before your surgery. Don’t even chew gum, because this can stimulate gastric acids.
    • Prepare your body for surgery. Take a shower the night before your surgery. You should also shave the area where you’ll have surgery, either the night before or the morning of your surgery. This includes the full area of the scrotal sac, extending to the groin areas on either side, but not the pubic area above the penis.
    • Make preparations for your recovery. Enlist someone’s help getting to and from the clinic, because you won’t be able to drive for 48 hours after the surgery. Arrange time off work, because you’ll need at least a week to rest and recuperate. Make sure your home is in order, and that you have everything you’ll need in easy reach of the place where you plan to rest after surgery. Have a compassionate support system in place, so that you’ll know someone will be there to help care for you during the time that you need to take it easy and heal.

    If you’re interested in reversing your vasectomy and you’re looking for an experienced professional surgical team, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here for you. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.