• What to Expect with Your Vasectomy Reversal

    Are you considering a vasectomy reversal? Maybe you’ve changed your mind about your ideal family size, and now you want to try for a child. The good news is that vasectomy reversals are more successful today than they’ve ever been before. However, the procedure is more complicated than your vasectomy was, and it’s important for you to know what to expect.

    • On the day of your surgery, arrive 90 minutes before your scheduled operation. Make sure that you follow your doctor’s instructions, and don’t eat anything for eight hours before the surgery unless you are told otherwise by your doctor. You don’t need to do any special preparation, and the operating room staff will clip any hair as needed for the surgery, as part of their operative preparations.
    • When you arrive, you’ll be taken to the surgical preoperative area. If your significant other would like to stay with you during this time, that’s perfectly fine. Your doctor will meet with you in the preoperative suite, in order to answer any questions and discuss your procedure. The anesthesiologist will come by as well, and help you decide on the best choice of anesthesia.
    • While you’re still in the preoperative suite, you’ll be given an IV. After the nurse inserts the IV, you’ll be given a sedative. If you’re like most patients, you won’t remember anything after that until you’re back in the recovery area.
    • Immediately after the surgery, you’re not likely to experience pain. You may feel some numbness in the scrotum, but until the anesthesia wears off a few hours later, you probably won’t feel any discomfort. When the local anesthesia wears off, you can use an ice pack, provided by the medical staff, to decrease swelling and ease soreness. Make sure to apply the cold pack over the scrotal support and never directly to the skin. A little bit of blood oozing from between the sutures or out of the drains is to be expected, and it’s very unlikely you’ll have any significant bleeding.
    • Once you’re fully awake and alert, you’ll be discharged with prescriptions for antibiotics and pain medication. A responsible adult must escort you out of the Surgery Center and take you home, because you won’t be allowed to drive for 24 hours after surgery, nor take a cab alone.

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and offer a payment plan for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.

  • Five Fast Facts about Vasectomy Reversals

    A vasectomy is considered a permanent method of sterilization, but is it really permanent? Between six and ten percent of men who have had vasectomies will change their minds at some point and consider a vasectomy reversal. In truth, even though in times past it was a long shot, today vasectomy reversal is extremely doable. Here are some things you might want to know about this increasingly common procedure.

    1. Vasectomy reversal is a largely successful outpatient procedure. When a vasectomy is performed, the surgeon reroutes or clamps the internal tubing that carries sperm from the testicles through the penis. This tube, called the vas deferens, is restored in a vasectomy reversal. Using microsurgery techniques that involve surgical microscopes and stitches finer than a human hair, the doctor re-attaches the tubing. It only takes about two hours, and the patient can usually go back to work in a day or two.
    2. A man’s testicles never stop making sperm. A vasectomy prevents sperm from leaving the body, but it doesn’t stop sperm production. Therefore, once the reversal is complete, normal fertility is restored. After three weeks or so of abstinence, to allow for healing, the couple can try to conceive.
    3. Time is a factor in vasectomy reversal success, but it may not be the biggest factor. The rates of success for a vasectomy reversal are as high as 95 percent for vasectomies done within the past 10 years. After 15 years, the success rate begins to decline, but the health of the man’s sperm and the age of the female partner are just as significant in the chances of conception.
    4. Fertility plays a role, even after a successful reversal. Before a man goes through a vasectomy reversal, he and his partner should be examined for fertility issues as well as overall health. Sometimes, the best option for conception is in vitro fertilization, so the doctor may recommend a sperm retrieval to increase the chances of conception.
    5. Insurance probably doesn’t cover the procedure. It’s important to note, before deciding to undergo a vasectomy reversal, that it’s typically not covered by insurance. Therefore, patients need to be prepared to pay out of pocket.

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and offer a payment plan for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.

  • Vasectomy Reversals 101

    If you’ve had a vasectomy, is it really permanent? Vasectomies are permanent in that they can only be reversed through surgery. However, using vasectomy reversal, your surgeon can restore fertility and make it possible for you to have children.

    Vasectomy reversal is surgery to reconnect the tubes (vas deferens) that carry sperm from the testicles into the semen. Once the tubes are connected, sperm reenters the semen, and it’s possible to conceive. There are different factors that affect the success of the reversal, and pregnancy rates after the reversal range from 30 percent to more than 90 percent. The length of time since the vasectomy was performed, the age of the man’s partner, the surgeon’s experience and training, and fertility issues that existed prior to the vasectomy all play a part in the success of the reversal.

    Most of the time, a vasectomy reversal is performed as an outpatient procedure. Sometimes it requires general anesthesia, while other times only a local anesthetic is given, to keep the patient from feeling pain without causing him to lose consciousness. The most common type of vasectomy reversal is a vasovasostomy, in which the surgeon sews together the severed ends of each vas deferens. Less common is the vasoepididymostomy, which is more complicated and typically used with the simpler vasovasostomy won’t work. In a vasoepididymostomy, the surgeon attaches the vas deferens directly to the epididymis, the small organ, located at the back of the testicle, that holds sperm. Complications rarely occur, but when they do, they include bleeding within the scrotum, infection at the surgery site, and chronic pain. Carefully following the doctor’s instructions will help reduce these risks.

    When a vasectomy reversal is successful, semen may contain sperm within just a few weeks. In some cases though, it takes a year or more for sperm to appear. The surgeon is an important factor in the success rate of a vasectomy reversal, and choosing a surgeon who is trained in and uses microsurgical techniques greatly increases the odds of success. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about the doctor’s experience when choosing a surgeon, because a surgeon who has done the procedure many times is more likely to perform it successfully. Make sure, too, that the surgeon is qualified to perform a vasoepididymostomy, in case that becomes necessary.

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of the experienced and knowledgeable Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks and offer a payment plan for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.

  • Is It Ever Too Late to Have a Vasectomy Reversal?

    If you underwent a vasectomy in the past, you probably intended for it to be permanent. If you’re in a different situation now and have changed your mind about having children, you may be concerned that it’s not possible. Is a vasectomy reversal really effective? And even if it is, will it work for you if your vasectomy was done several years ago? 

    In most cases, vasectomies are reversible. A skilled surgeon can perform the necessary micro-surgery and reconnect the vas deferens, restoring sperm to the ejaculate. A vasectomy performed more than fifteen years ago may be more challenging, because there may be further blockage in addition to the vasectomy. If this is the case, the surgeon will need to perform a more involved procedure, known as vasoepididymostomy, to restore sperm flow and fertility. This surgery involves connecting the vas deferens to the epididymis, rather than just reconnecting the vas deferens itself.  Modern technology has led to great advances in these kinds of surgery, though, and even for complicated vasectomies, the success rate is high.  

    In fact, recent research indicates that older vasectomies can be reversed almost as easily as younger ones. In a study of 1229 men having vasectomy reversals, grouped into more recent (1-15 years) and less recent (16-38 years) vasectomies, the rates of successful reversal were statistically very close. The success rates, measured by the rate of achieving moving ejaculated sperm counts after the surgery, were 88% in younger vasectomies and 65% in older. Further, the sperm counts obtained in these two groups of men following their reversal surgeries were the same, averaging about 55 million sperm.  

    What does this all mean? First, after undergoing a vasectomy, men continue to make just as much sperm as they did before, and that continues no matter how long they have the vasectomy. Additionally, this research indicates that older vasectomies are more reversible than ever thought possible previously, which means it’s never too late to have a vasectomy reversal and make fatherhood a reality.  

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

  • The Risks, Results, and Success Rates of Vasectomy Reversals

    If you have had a vasectomy and now regret it, you may wonder if you can have it reversed. The good news is that vasectomy reversals have come a long way, and it’s very possible to have a successful reversal. The bad news? The surgery can be far more complicated than a vasectomy.  

    • How is the procedure performed? Because a vasectomy involves severing or blocking the tubes that carry sperm from your testes to your penis, a vasectomy reversal is done by rejoining them. This is done using microsurgery, either to sew the ends of these tubes (vas deferens) back together, in a procedure called vasovasostomy, or to attach the ends of tubes to the small organ at the back of the testicle that holds sperm. This is called a vasoepididymostomy, and it’s a much more difficult procedure, used only if for some reason you can’t have a vasovasostomy or your doctor believes it won’t work for you. Sometimes, it’s necessary for a doctor to perform a combination of these two procedures.  
    • How major of a procedure is it? A vasectomy reversal is either performed in a hospital or a clinic, typically under general anesthesia. It takes between two to four hours, and the patient can usually go home the same day. Patients with desk jobs can usually return to work in a couple of days, while those who do physical labor or have a job that involves excessive walking or driving may need to wait a while longer.  
    • What are the risks? It’s rare to experience any serious complications from a vasectomy reversal, but there are a few risks. Sometimes, bleeding within the scrotum leads to a collection of blood called a hematoma, which can be painful. Rarely, patients experience chronic pain after a vasectomy reversal or contract an infection that requires antibiotics. The best way to reduce the risks of complications is to follow your doctor’s instructions exactly.  
    • How soon will you know the results of the procedure? Your doctor will collect semen samples from you for about four to six months, and examine them to check for the reappearance of sperm. For patients who undergo a vasovasostomyit can take as long as six to twelve months for sperm to reappear, while those who have a vasoepididymostomy may have to wait more than a year.  
    • What’s the success rate for vasectomy reversals? That’s another piece of good news. Up to 90 percent of vasectomy reversals are successful. Of course, the ability to conceive a child involves many factors, and pregnancy rates after vasectomy vary widely, ranging from 30 to 90 percent. Sometimes patients decide to have some sperm frozen prior to the procedure, in case it’s unsuccessful. That way, even if they are unable to conceive through intercourse, they may be able to use assistive reproductive technology to father children.  

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

  • Your Sperm Count After a Vasectomy Reversal

     

    Vasectomy reversals have a high success rate, and many men and their partners are able to conceive naturally after having a vasectomy reversed. However, reaching optimal sperm production after having the surgery can take as long as six to twelve months. Why so long? More importantly, is there anything that can be done to optimize your sperm count after a vasectomy reversal?  

    To understand sperm count, it’s helpful to know a little bit about sperm production. A sperm cycle is usually about 90 days. That’s the amount of time it takes for your body to produce new sperm and get rid of the old sperm through ejaculation. After a vasectomy reversal, when a man goes in for his sixweek postoperative semen analysis, the sperm motility is typically still low, because the man is still working on getting rid of old, dead, sperm found in the ejaculate. For most men, it takes about two sperm cycles, or six months, to achieve good sperm quality.  

    If your vasectomy reversal was done by an experienced, well-qualified, specially trained microsurgeon, you can rest assured that your sperm counts will eventually rise as your body returns to optimal sperm production. It’s important to be patient, though, and understand that this process will take some time. While you wait, there are some things you can do to help boost your sperm count.  

    • Take your recovery seriously. For a couple of weeks after your surgery, it’s important to take it easy, minimizing straining, pulling, lifting, and stretching. Even everyday actions like getting in and out of a car can cause strain, so be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions to the letter.  
    • Don’t rush back into sex. After a vasectomy reversal, wait three to four weeks before resuming sexual activity. Once the waiting period is over, though, frequent ejaculation is a great way to keep the sperm flowing through your tubes, which helps keep them open.  
    • Eat a nutrient-dense diet. While vitamin and antioxidants in supplement form may help, there’s really no substitute for a well-balanced diet that’s packed with vegetables and fruits.  
    • Take anti-inflammatories if your doctor recommends them. At the post-operative check, your doctor can tell you whether there is scarring at the surgical site, which can be improved with anti-inflammatory medications.  
    • Stay out of the hot tub. High water temperatures can kill healthy sperm, so avoid excessive heat.  
    • Watch your alcohol consumption, and don’t smokeAlcohol can impair sperm production, and smoking slows wound healing.  
    • Follow up with your doctor. It’s important to keep all the recommended follow-up appointments so that your doctor can monitor your progress and make sure you’re healing correctly.  

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

  • How Age Affects Vasectomy Reversal

    Sometimes, men undergo vasectomies fairly early in their adulthood. It could be that the man feels he’ll never want children, or it might be that he and his partner decide they’re finished having a family, or it may be another, personal reason. Whatever compels the decision, there may come a time when he regrets having made it. Sometimes, it’s because he’s entered into a relationship with a new partner, and now they as a couple have decided they want more children. This may be much later in the man’s life, long after he had the vasectomy. Is it still possible, many years later, to have a vasectomy reversal?  

    Yes, it’s still possible. A vasectomy can be successfully reversed years or even decades after the initial surgery. Is there a time at which a man is too old to have a vasectomy reversal?  

    For women, the time of fertility is well-defined. Because women are born with a fixed number of eggs, conception becomes challenging by the time a woman is in her early to mid40s. The eggs that have not been lost with ovulation over the course of her life have begun to age and decline in quality. While there are women who become pregnant in their 40s or even 50s, it’s not very common. For most women, it’s not easy to conceive at an older age, which is why women seeking fertility treatment often use donor eggs.  

    For men, fertility is completely different. Men don’t start making sperm until they reach puberty, and they constantly make new sperm, turning their sperm reserve over completely every three to four months. The implications for fertility are simple: men in their 40s, 50s, and 60s typically have normal sperm production, and they’re making fresh sperm all the time, no matter their age. It’s only until a man reaches his 70’s or 80’s that sperm production falters, resulting in a lower sperm count.  

    What does this mean for vasectomy reversal? Even in their 50s and 60s, men can successfully undergo vasectomy reversal. Many men have their vasectomies reversed in this age range and are able to conceive naturally. The bigger concern is the age of the man’s female partner, and if her age is an issue, there are many options that can be considered when trying to conceive.  

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

  • Facts You Should Know Before a Vasectomy Reversal

    It happens more often than you might think. A man decides he does not want any more children, gets a vasectomy, and changes his mind later. In fact, as many as 30,000 men decide each year to have vasectomy reversals. If this is something you’re considering, here are some things you need to know.  

    • Vasectomy reversal is definitely doable. Even though vasectomy is considered a permanent form of sterilization, vasectomy reversal actually has high success rates. It’s a minimally invasive outpatient procedure that simply restores continuity to the vas deferens. Using microsurgery techniques, the surgeon stitches the tubing back together, and in most cases, the patient can return to work within just a few days. It’s safe, too, with the risks of bleeding and infection at less than one half of a percent.  
    • Vasectomy doesn’t stop the production of sperm. The vasectomy procedure doesn’t keep the testicles from making sperm, it just prevents the sperm from leaving the body. That’s why it’s possible to restore normal fertility with a vasectomy reversal. After a recovery time of about three weeks, during which time he’ll need to abstain from sex, a patient can begin trying to conceive. It may take as long as a year for fertility to return, however, particularly for men in whom there was a blockage in the epididymis.  
    • Time can get in the way of a successful reversal. Vasectomy reversal works best, with a success rate of up to 95 percent, when the vasectomy was performed within 10 years. If it’s been more than 15 years since the procedure occurred, the success rate begins to decline. Even after a successful reversal, though, fertility may still be an issue, depending on the health of the man and his partner.  
    • It’s important to consider your partner’s fertility as well as your ownWhen considering a vasectomy reversal, a man and his partner should be examined for any fertility issues. The quality of the man’s sperm, the age of the woman, and other factors may come into play and make other options more effective. Sometimes, a sperm retrieval procedure is used to enable in vitro fertilization.  
    • Insurance doesn’t typically cover vasectomy reversal. If you are considering vasectomy reversal, be aware that you’ll probably need to pay for it out of pocket. When looking for a surgeon, it may be helpful to find one with flexible payment options.  

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

  • Does a Vasectomy or a Vasectomy Reversal Affect Your Sex Drive?

    A vasectomy is a very popular form of birth control, and each year, about 500,000 men in the United States undergo this procedure in order to gain control over their reproduction. It’s safe and effective, and it’s permanent unless you choose to have it surgically reversed. Additionally, it’s cost effective and less invasive than a tubal ligation is for a woman. It’s easy to see why it’s a popular option, but many men have questions about their sex drive after they undergo a vasectomy.  

    If you are concerned about this, there’s no need to worry. Experts have determined that there is no negative relationship between a vasectomy and sex drive because nothing in your body changes physiologically. The blood vessels and nerves that are involved in erections and ejaculation are intact after a vasectomy, so there’s no risk of impotence or a lowered ability to maintain an erection. Post-vasectomy, you should have the same libido and sex drive, and you’ll be able to have and maintain erections, ejaculate, and have an orgasm. There may be a small reduction in the volume of your ejaculate because vasectomy prevents sperm from being released into the semen. You’ll still have the same male hormones, though, and in addition to having the same sex drive, you’ll also have the same voice and be able to grow facial hair.  

    In the first couple of months after a vasectomy, some men to report occasional mild aching in their testicles during arousal. But in fact, having a vasectomy can actually increase sexual satisfaction because men have less anxiety during lovemaking. This is because there’s no longer anxiety over a potential unplanned pregnancy. Because men have more control over their own reproductive function, they report more having intense, pleasurable, and spontaneous sex, more frequently.  

    So what if a man decides to reverse his vasectomy? About ten percent of men decide later that they would like to have children and decide to have surgery to return sperm to the ejaculate. Does this reversal have a negative impact on the sex drive?  

    Again, the answer is no. In fact, before a vasectomy, after a vasectomy, and after a vasectomy reversal, the testicles still produce testosterone, which stimulates the sex drive. Because a vasectomy reversal does not involve any of the structures that have an impact on a man’s libido or his ability to achieve and maintain an erection, neither the sex drive nor the erections are affected. After a vasectomy, fertility is restored sometime in the next year, and the drive to conceive can even boost the sex drive.  

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal in Tampa or Orlando, Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

     

  • Facts Women Want to Know About Vasectomy Reversals

    Men are the ones who have vasectomies and vasectomy reversals, but the decision to undergo these procedures is usually made by a man and woman together. Interestingly, when men are considering having a vasectomy reversed, it’s often the women who have the most questions about the procedure. To address these concerns, we’ve compiled a list of questions women typically ask about vasectomy reversals, along with the answers to these questions 

    • What’s involved in a vasectomy reversal? A microsurgical procedure, a vasectomy reversal is intended to reattach the vans deferens, allowing it to transport sperm from the testicles to the penis. This is done in one of two ways: 
    • If there’s sperm in the vas deferens, a vasovasostomy is used to reconnect the two cut ends of the vas deferens.  
    • The other option is an epididymovasostomy, in which the surgeon sutures the ends of the vas deferens to the epididymis, bypassing a blockage on the vasectomy site.  
    • Is it dangerous? The risks and complications of a vasectomy reversal are similar to those posed by a vasectomy. These include pain and swelling during the first few days, and a slight risk of infection, which can be treated with an antibiotic. Sometimes, men experience issues like nausea, headache, constipation, or muscle aches, and there’s a possibility that blood will accumulate in the scrotum as a hematoma. If that happens, the doctor can drain the hematoma.  
    • How long does the procedure take? It depends on what type of surgery is needed. A vasovasostomy takes between two and five hours, but an epididymovasostomy takes an hour or two longer.  
    • Does a vasectomy reversal affect libido? No! None of the structures that are involved in arousal or getting and maintaining an erection are impacted by vasectomy reversal. Therefore, just as with a vasectomy, a vasectomy reversal does not have an effect on the sex drive.  
    • How long is the recovery time after a vasectomy reversal? A vasectomy reversal is typically performed in an outpatient or office setting, and men can go home after a short while, as long as they feel well enough to travel. For at least the first 24 hours, bed rest will be required. After that, it’s important to restrict activities for about four or five days. For the first three to four weeks, all heavy lifting and physical exertion should be avoided. To alleviate discomfort in the first 48 hours or so, an ice pack can be used to minimize swelling, and pain relievers can relieve discomfort. Sexual activity should be avoided for about 30 days.  
    • What’s the success rate of vasectomy reversals? Overall, the success rate for a vasectomy reversal within ten years of the vasectomy can reach 97 percent, and after 15 years it drops to about 70 percent. The type of surgery affects the success rate, with epididymovasostomy at a lower rate of about 50-60 percent.  
    • How long does it take for fertility to return after a vasectomy is reversed? Usually, it takes several months for fertility to return, and sometimes it can take up to a year. Once fertility is restored, a vasectomy reversal results in pregnancy in 40 to 75 percent of cases.  
    • If the procedure doesn’t work, what are some other options? The good news is that there are several options available. If it’s not successful, you can always try a repeat vasectomy. Another possibility is to use Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART), which includes approaches like In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI). 
    • How can I choose the best doctor for vasectomy reversal? Ask your family doctor or urologist for referrals, or search the internet for qualified vasectomy reversal microsurgeons. Once you have compiled a list of possible surgeons, check their websites and arrange for consultations with the most promising. Ask questions about the doctor’s educational background and whether he or she completed a specialized fellowship, as well as questions about the doctor’s success rate and how many vasectomies have been performed. Ask for credentials and recommendations, compiling your list of questions before you go. 

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal in Tampa or Orlando, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.