• Healthy Baby Food to Make at Home

    There are many healthy baby food recipes that you can make at home, and they don’t have to be boring or bland. You can make nutrient-rich, flavorful, and fun foods for your little one to enjoy. Read on to learn more about the benefits of homemade baby food and to get some tips on how to get started.

    The Benefits of Homemade Baby Food

    The benefits of making your own baby food at home have prompted many parents to do so. Homemade baby food is:

    • More Nutritious: When you make your own baby food, you have complete control over what goes into it. This means that you can choose to use fresh, organic ingredients that are high in nutrients. Commercial baby foods often contain preservatives and other additives that can be harmful to your child’s health.

     

    • More Affordable: Making your own baby food is typically more affordable than purchasing commercial varieties. This is especially true if you purchase ingredients in bulk or grow your own fruits and vegetables.

     

    • Tailored Flavor and Texture: You can tailor the flavor and texture of homemade baby food to better suit your child’s preferences. For example, if your baby is still getting used to solid foods, you can make a puree that is easy to eat and digest. As your child gets older, you can start to add in more textured foods such as chunks of fruit or vegetables.

     

    • Quality bonding time: One of the best parts about making your own baby food is the quality bonding time it provides. During mealtimes, you can sit down with your little one and chat while they enjoy their food. This is a great way to create lasting memories together.

    Ensure that your baby is getting the nutrients they need by making your own baby food. That way, you can control what goes into it and how it is prepared. Plus, homemade baby food often tastes better than store-bought varieties.

    Ideas to Get You Started

    If you’re interested in trying your hand at making homemade baby food, there are a few things you’ll need to get started. First, invest in a good quality blender or food processor. You’ll also need some basic kitchen supplies like measuring cups and spoons, as well as storage containers for freezing any leftover baby food. Finally, it’s helpful to have a recipe book on hand for ideas and inspiration. With these tools in hand, you’re ready to start whipping up healthy, delicious meals for your little one!

    Healthy Baby Food Recipes

    When it comes to healthy baby food recipes, there are endless possibilities. Here are some ideas to get you started:

     

    • Pureed fruits and vegetables: These are great for starting solids or for older babies who are ready for more textured foods. Try pureeing carrots, sweet potatoes, peas, apples, bananas, and other fruits and veggies. You can also mix and match different flavors to create new taste combinations.

     

    • Fruit and veggie pouches: These are convenient and easy to take on the go. Simply fill reusable pouches with your baby’s favorite pureed fruits or vegetables.

     

    • Homemade baby cereals: Start with a simple rice cereal and then add in pureed fruits or vegetables for additional nutrition and flavor. Oats and barley are other great options for homemade baby cereals.

     

    • Finger foods: As your baby starts to develop their pincer grasp, they will be ready for finger foods. Offer them soft fruits and vegetables that they can easily pick up and eat, such as ripe bananas, cooked sweet potatoes, and steamed broccoli florets.

     

    • Healthy snacks: There are plenty of healthy snack options for babies and toddlers. Try making your own fruit bars or energy bites using pureed fruits, oats, nuts, and seeds. You can also offer air-popped popcorn, whole grain crackers, and yogurt dips.

    Making your own baby food is a great way to ensure that your little one is getting the nutrients they need. And it’s also a fun way to get creative in the kitchen! Try out some of these healthy baby food recipes and see what your little one enjoys the most.

    Visit our blog to stay up-to-date with information and tips for healthy parenting and more! The Center for Vasectomy Reversal in Florida is helping families across the country reach their fertility goals. Contact us today to schedule a consultation.

     

  • Healthy Foods to Feed Growing Kids

    Kids between the ages of two and 12 grow very quickly. For them to stay healthy, they need the right diet, with foods that provide protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins to promote proper development. This can be challenging, because young children are often picky eaters. It’s important to be consistent, offering healthy options and setting a good example. To foster appropriate development of mental and motor skills, offer grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and protein, including these top picks from dieticians.

    • Berries: Strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries are delicious and packed with vitamin C, antioxidants, and phytonutrients. These nutrients help boost the immune system and protect cells from damage. They’re easy to incorporate in a child’s diet, too, whether on their own, in pancakes or muffins, or as toppings for yogurt, ice cream, or cereal.
    • Fruit: Apples, pears, oranges, banana, mango, and kiwi are all excellent choices, tasty and full of vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and plant polyphenols. Kids can snack on them, or you can incorporate them into baked goods and smoothies or use them to top oatmeal or yogurt.
    • Eggs: A great source of choline, protein, and vitamins, eggs are good for brain development. They’re easy to prepare, boiled, fried, or scrambled, or added to soup, oatmeal, gravy, rice, and noodles, or in desserts like custard.
    • Dairy: Cow’s milk and cheese contain calcium, phosphorous, vitamin D, and protein, for healthy bones and muscles. For children under two, full-fat milk is the best option, for extra energy. Milk is easy to drink at meals, have with cereal or cookies, or blend with fruit for smoothies. Cheese is a good snack, especially mild varieties like mozzarella or American cheese. Serve slices, cubes, or strings, or melt cheese on toast or pizza, or sprinkle grated cheese over noodles.
    • Colorful Vegetables: Make a game of seeing how many different colors your child can eat, because brightly colored fruits and vegetables have powerful antioxidants. Root vegetables like carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, purple potatoes, potatoes, and parsnips are loaded with potassium, magnesium, fiber, beta-carotene, iron, and vitamins A, B and C, among other nutrients. Green vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, and arugula, along with cauliflower, provide folate, fiber, phytonutrients, and vitamins A, C, and K. These nutrients strengthen the immune system, lower inflammation, and can even reduce the risk of cancer. Try different vegetables, prepared different ways, in stews, mashed, baked into goodies, baked into chips, or raw, with your child’s favorite dip.
    • Legumes: Legumes, including beans, peas, and lentils, provide fiber, vitamin B, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and protein. And guess what? Peanuts are also a legume, so your child’s favorite peanut butter is full of nutrition plus healthy monounsaturated fats. Make sure when you choose peanut butter, though, that you pick a brand with no added sugar, palm oil, or partially hydrogenated fats. You can probably think of several ways to feed your child peanut butter, but other legumes are versatile, too. Add them to soups, stews, chilis, casseroles, and salads, serve as side dishes, or blend them and use them as a base for baked goods and sauces.
    • Whole grains: Avoid processed white flour, opting for whole wheat flour instead, to reap the benefits of the naturally contained zinc, iron, copper, magnesium, vitamins E and B, phytonutrients, and antioxidants, as well as the fiber that can help maintain digestive health. Remember, whole grains include brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, bulgur wheat, barley, oats, millet, and corn, so you have a lot of options.
    • Meat and Fish: Great sources of protein, these foods provide other important nutrients, too. Beef and chicken contain important vitamins, like vitamins A, B, D, E, and K, as well as minerals like iron, zinc, magnesium, and phosphorus. Chicken is higher in vitamins, while beef has more minerals. Fish has omega-3 fatty acids, for eye, brain, and nerve development.
    • Seeds: Work sunflower, pumpkin, hemp, chia, and flaxseeds into your child’s diet for a healthy dose of vitamin E, minerals, fiber, protein, and healthy fats.

    A healthy life for your child begins in the womb, and at the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • How Common is it for Babies to Have Jaundice

    If the doctor tells you that your baby has jaundice, that news may alarm you. However, it’s fairly common and usually harmless. Here are some facts you may need to know about newborn jaundice.

    • The symptoms of jaundice include yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes. It can also cause dark, yellow urine, instead of colorless, or pale-colored stools, rather than yellow or orange. The characteristic yellowing can be difficult to see on darker skin tones and may be easier to see on the palms or soles of the feet.
    • Your doctor will examine your baby for jaundice before you leave the hospital. As part of the newborn physical examination, the doctor will check for jaundice within 72 hours of birth. That’s because the symptoms usually develop about two days after the baby is born. If you believe your baby has jaundice after you’ve gone home, you can check by gently pressing on your baby’s forehead or nose, in good lighting. If the skin looks yellow where you’ve pressed it, it could be jaundice. In that case, speak to your healthcare provider as soon as possible.
    • What causes jaundice? Jaundice occurs because bilirubin, a yellow substance produced by the breakdown of red blood cells, builds up in the blood. It’s common in newborns because they have a high number of red blood cells, and those cells are broken down and replaced frequently. Further, the liver is responsible for removing bilirubin in the blood, and a baby’s liver is not fully developed so it doesn’t do it as effectively. Sometimes, jaundice is caused by infection, internal bleeding, liver or bile duct malfunction, abnormal red blood cells, or enzyme deficiency. Jaundice affects about six out of every 10 babies.
    • There are risk factors that can increase your baby’s likelihood of developing jaundice. Being born before 37 weeks increases a baby’s risk of jaundice, and eight in 10 babies born prematurely will develop this condition. Breastfeeding raises the risk of jaundice, though it is believed that the substantial benefits of breastfeeding outweigh this risk. Bruising during birth can increase the risk of jaundice, as can a difference between the mother’s blood type and the baby’s. Babies of East Asian ancestry are at increased risk of jaundice.
    • How is jaundice treated? Typically, jaundice resolves on its own, without treatment, by the time the baby is about two weeks old. For one in 20 babies, though, the blood bilirubin level gets high enough to warrant treatment. There are two treatments typically used to bring bilirubin levels down quickly:
      • Phototherapy uses light shining on the skin.
      • Exchange transfusion is a procedure in which the baby’s blood is removed and replaced with blood from a matching donor.
    • Left untreated, jaundice can lead to serious complications. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy occurs when bilirubin, which is toxic to brain cells, passes into the brain. This can cause listlessness, difficulty waking, high-pitched crying, poor sucking or feeding, backward arching, and fever. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy can lead to a syndrome called kernicterus, which is permanent damage to the brain. Fortunately, kernicterus is rare.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • How To Pick The Right Crib

    If you’re preparing a room for a new baby, one of your biggest decisions is going to be what crib to purchase. There’s a wide variety of styles and features. Here’s a guide to picking the right crib for your baby and your home, focusing on the different kinds of crib available.

    Standard Size Crib – These full-size cribs provide a lot of room for your baby to grow into. They’re good when you have a fairly large area designated for your baby. It should have multiple mattress settings so that you can lower the mattress height as your baby grows and pulls up to a standing position.

    Convertible Cribs – These cribs have gained a lot in popularity in recent years because they grow with your child. They can be converted into day beds, toddler beds, and even full-size beds.

    Multi-Functional/Multi-Purpose Cribs – These cribs usually come with an attachable dresser that has a changing table top that can be used as a nightstand later. They may have drawers, open shelves or a combination of the two. Many of these are also convertible cribs.

    Round Cribs – Oval or round cribs have a soft, old-fashioned, fairy tale look in contrast to rectangular cribs. Due to their unusual shape, bedding that fits properly can be harder to find.

    Bassinets, Cradles and Bedside Sleepers – These are all smaller, more portable and lighter-weight options that work well for your baby’s first four to five months. They can generally be used until the baby starts to roll over and push up on her hands and knees. Cradles provide gentle rocking movements, and bedside sleepers can be kept right next to your bed allowing mom to nurse without getting out of bed. They’re less expensive than full-size or convertible cribs.

    Playards – Playards are light and portable play and sleep options that usually have an aluminium frame and mesh sides. Many come with a mattress pad or padded floor. They’re easy to set up and pack up for travel but aren’t considered to be sturdy enough to be the primary sleeping surface for your baby.

    Safety Considerations – Any crib manufactured after 2011 should be up to current safety regulations in terms of size and spacing of slats, fire prevention, etc, but you should check for crib recalls at the Keeping Babies Safe website before making your purchase.

    Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in helping men become parents. For more information about the vasectomy reversal procedure, please contact our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-210-6649 or schedule a free consultation online.

  • How to Pick the Right Babysitter

    Babysitters are a great resource for parents with activities outside the home, or just mom and dads who need a date night. Of course you want to find the best babysitter available. Here are a few tips for just how to do that.

    ASK LOCAL FRIENDS AND FAMILY

    If you have nearby friends and family with children, the first step for you is to ask them what babysitters they use. If they don’t know of a great babysitter to recommend to you, they may know someone who does. If you belong to a church you can also ask fellow churchgoers with children for their recommendations. You can also ask neighbors with children.

    JOIN A LOCAL FACEBOOK GROUP

    Today there’s a Facebook group for almost every interest or need. Most communities have a local facebook group where residents ask each other for advice about local resources. This often includes discussions about babysitters. Consider joining a Facebook group for parents near you. This could also help you make friends, learn more about your community, arrange playdates, etc.

    INVITE THEM OVER

    If you’re nervous about trying a new babysitter for your child, try inviting her to your home. This will give you the opportunity to ask her important questions and to introduce her to your child. Observe how they interact, and how the babysitter adapts to your child’s demeanor.

    ASK GOOD QUESTIONS

    Before talking to a prospective babysitter, develop some questions for her that pertain to your concerns. This allows you to gauge whether this person’s babysitting philosophy and attitude are compatible with yours. If your child has any special conditions, struggles or needs, write these down before the interview or screening process, and be sure to bring them up.

    CHECK THOSE REFERENCES

    Every good babysitter has several references available. Take the time to contact them and ask a few questions.

    KEEP GOOD NOTES

    It’s important to keep good notes on your quest to find a great babysitter, for all the obvious reasons. But even if you find the perfect one, it’s important to have a good backup or two. Keep those names and phone numbers. It’s also good to know a few sitters to share with other parents who may need their services.

    TRY MORE THAN ONE

    Even if you’re confident in the babysitter you’ve chosen, it usually doesn’t hurt to try out more than one. You can compare these experiences against each other. Ask your child about their experiences with these babysitters.

    Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in helping men become parents. For more information about the vasectomy reversal procedure, please contact our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-210-6649 or schedule a free consultation online.

     

     

  • Preparing Your Kids for School

    The first week of kindergarten or preschool is very exciting. But if your child is unprepared, it can also be stressful. Here are a few things you and your child can do to prepare for school.

    ATTEND ORIENTATION DAY

    Orientation day is a great opportunity for you and your child to become familiar with his or her new school. At orientation, you talk to the new teacher and headmaster or director, see the classroom, and have a look around the school. It’s also a great chance to ask questions.

    READ BOOKS TOGETHER

    One central aspect of kindergarten or preschool is learning to read. This can be a great joy for a child or a great hurdle. One great thing you can do for your child is to have a good variety of books on hand — books you read to them and books they can enjoy on their own. This will help instill a love of reading in them, and ease the process into a more formal education setting that is largely centered on reading and writing.

    HELP DEVELOP FINE MOTOR SKILLS

    Writing and drawing are crucial activities in any preschool or kindergarten. To help this go smoothly, you want your child to have developed some fine motor skills. Have plenty of paper available, as well as crayons and pencils, so your child can work on this ability. Help your child draw basic shapes and figures. Teach her to spell her name. Continue with some basic words such as Mom, Dad, cat and dog. Encourage your child to draw.

    ARRANGE PLAYDATES

    If your child hasn’t been attending a preschool, it may be overwhelming for him or her to be surrounded by so many other children. This is especially true if your child is an only child or just has a sibling or two. To help home or her develop social skills to successfully interact with other children, it can be helpful to arrange playdates with other children around the same age.

    PART-TIME PRESCHOOL

    It’s easier for a new kindergartener to ease into full-time school if she’s spent some time at a preschool. Preschools allow students to attend as regular full-time students or as part-time students. This familiarizes them with the school environment and how to properly interact with teachers and other students.

    POTTY TRAINING

    Attending kindergarten or preschool will be so much easier for your child and his teacher if your child is fully potty-trained. And of course, this makes life easier for parents as well. Potty-training can be quite a challenging activity but it’s always worth the trouble. Fortunately there are many resources online to help you train your child to successfully use the toilet.

    Do you have a child about to begin school, or do you dream of having one? Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in helping men become parents. For more information about the vasectomy reversal procedure, please contact our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-210-6649 or schedule a free consultation online.

  • How to Emotionally Prepare for a New Baby

    Preparing for a new baby can be overwhelming. You’re not only preparing your home and adjusting your life’s schedule for a needy new family member. You’re also, if you know it or not, anticipating the emotions that this life change will bring. Don’t keep this emotional aspect of your life below the surface and unexamined. If you want to fully prepare for your new baby, take stock of your own emotions, and take a look at ways that you can manage them.

    THERE ARE NO PERFECT PARENTS

    There may be a creeping feeling that you won’t have your house, your life and your self in perfect order for your new baby. Fear not! No one achieves perfection before or after a child arrives. Every parent makes mistakes. Take deep breaths and focus on what is achievable.

    TALK TO YOUR PARTNER

    Your partner is going through the same stress you are. Ask him or her how they’re doing, and share your own emotions. This is a grand adventure you’re embarking upon together, and communication is crucial.

    ASK A PARENT FOR WISDOM

    You surely know a lot of other parents, including your own mom and dad. Ask them about the emotions of bringing home a new baby. They won’t remember everything, but they’ll remember what really mattered to them. It couldn’t hurt to take some notes from these chats. You’ve got a lot on your plate right now, so it’s easy to forget things.

    NO SHAME IN THERAPY

    If your stress is significant, and talking to your partner or other parents hasn’t allayed it, consider seeing a therapist. They’re professionally trained to discuss these stresses with you in ways that should help you along a healthy path.

    GET SOME R&R

    Getting some rest and relaxation is always important, but especially in times of stress. Set apart some time to do the things make you happy and relaxed. Make sure your partner does the same. And spend some time together in ways that strengthen your bond. You’ll have less time for this with a new baby in the house. Make the best of it.

    CONQUER YOUR LISTS

    A bunch of to-do lists can add stress to your life, but crossing things off of them always feels nice, doesn’t it? Online live lists in programs such as Google Keep are helpful in that you can share them in real time with your partner through your devices, and see the changes that you both make. You can also drag items up or down on the list according to their priority. The best thing is: you can’t misplace these lists.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people build their families. That’s why we pride ourselves on providing state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides optimal surgical results and uncompromising, concierge-level patient care.  To learn more, call 941-313-7749 or contact us through our website.

  • What the Fourth Trimester Really Looks Like

    Have you heard of the 4th trimester? This is a term that pediatrician Dr. Harvey Karp is believed to have coined, meaning that the first three months of a baby’s life after birth. It goes with a theory that babies are born after nine months because their brains are so big that if they stayed in the womb much longer, they wouldn’t fit through the birth canal. They are still not quite ready, though, for life on the outside. In fact, according to this theory, it takes them about three more months to adjust.

    Those first 12 weeks are a time of major changes, as you become a parent and your sleepy, often fussy newborn becomes a calmer, happier, more alert baby. During the 4th trimester, babies experience significant physical, mental, and emotional development. It can help to think of your baby as still being a fetus for these first few months because your baby may be overwhelmed by the outside world and just want cuddles from you.

    It’s important to understand what life was like for your baby inside the womb. Inside your body, it was warm, but not especially dark, because a fetus can see the rays of the sun pass through your skin and muscle. Your baby is used to the sound of your voice, the whooshing of the blood in the uterine arteries, and plenty of soft, jiggly motion.

    During this 4th trimester, you can expect your baby to cry and be fussy. Babies will scream a lot, sleep a little, and essentially wear you out. To comfort a baby in this stage of life, keep your little one snugly wrapped or swaddled, and try swaying and shushing with the baby in the side/stomach position. Give your baby plenty of opportunities to suck, too. In fact, you can look at snug, shushing, swaging, side/stomach, and suck as the five S’s of the 4th trimester. They’re calming because they make the baby feel back at home.

    Those first three months may seem like a blur, but by the time your newborn hits the 3-month mark, everything will have changed. Suddenly your baby will be a little person with a curious mind, the beginnings of a personality, and some motor skills. Interacting with your newborn during the first few months can help foster all of this development. By holding, rocking, and talking to your baby, you’ll actually be nurturing a growing brain. Be prepared to feel worn out, but know that it’s all worth it, as you grow into a parent and form a deep connection with your new little one.

    If you’re ready to start a family, you can trust Center for Vasectomy Reversal to help. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Baby Safety Month

    Did you know that September is Baby Safety Month? Started in 1983 by the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA), it’s an annual opportunity for parents and retailers to refresh their knowledge of baby-proof standards. Originally, it was just one day, but in 1986 it expanded to a week, and in 1991 it became an entire month to gather and pass along worthwhile information. Do you know all you need to know to keep your baby safe? Here are some quick reminders.

    • Be car seat smart. Install the car seat properly and know the laws for transporting babies and children. Your child should start out rear-facing, move to forward-facing according to manufacturer’s recommendations and local law, go from a car seat to a booster, and ride in the back seat until age 13.
    • Know the crib rules. Put your baby on a firm mattress with a fitted sheet and remove blankets and toys from the crib. When the nights turn cold, use a sleep sack. Keep the crib away from windows, keeping strings and cords out of reach. If you’re using a second-hand crib, make sure it’s safe, has all the parts, and has not been recalled.
    • Stay age-appropriate. Pay attention to the manufacturer’s recommendations for the right age and developmental stage of toys, swings, bouncers, and carriers. Get rid of items once your child has surpassed the appropriate age.
    • Make bath time fun and safe. Keep your water heater at or below 120° F so that the water can never reach a point of burning the baby. Never leave a child unattended in the bath, always test the water temperature, and empty the tub after each use.
    • Keep your alarms in good working order. There should be a working smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector on every level of your home, as well as in all sleeping areas.
    • Be cautious when feeding your baby. Make sure the food is soft and easy to swallow and keep medicine out of reach.
    • Toss broken toys. Even the most appropriate toy can become dangerous if it breaks. Pay attention so that if any of your child’s toys are damaged or coming apart because the pieces need to be larger than your child’s mouth.
    • Protect against hazards obvious and not so obvious. Get down on your baby’s level and look for potential dangers. Use baby gates everywhere to keep your baby away from dangerous things. Babyproof things like outlets, cabinets, drawers, and dangling cords, but look at less obvious hazards as well, like tablecloths and curtains.

    Ready to share these tips? Use #BabySafetyMonth on social media. If you’re ready to start a family, call the Center for Vasectomy Reversal. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • What You Need to Know About Postpartum Depression

    During pregnancy, you probably daydreamed about your baby’s arrival bringing happiness, pride, and love into your home. So if you’re feeling sad, hopeless, or depressed after giving birth, you may be confused, upset, or even guilty that your daydreams haven’t become a reality. It’s important to understand how common these feelings are and what treatments are available for postpartum depression (PPD).

    Postpartum depression is not the same as “baby blues.”

    Up to 80 percent of mothers experience “baby blues” during the first week or two after giving birth, which may cause mood swings, anxiety, crying, and difficulty sleeping. This is not the same as postpartum depression, which affects about 15 percent of mothers, whether they have other children or not. The intensity and long-lasting nature of postpartum depression can make it difficult to care for yourself and your baby.

    Some symptoms of PPD include:

    • Depression or severe mood swings
    • Anxiety or panic attacks
    • Excessive crying, irritability, or anger
    • Difficulty bonding with the baby
    • Fear of being a bad mother
    • Withdrawing from social activities
    • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
    • Low energy
    • Feeling guilty, shameful, or worthless
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Thoughts of self-harm or hurting the baby
    • Suicidal ideation

    There are many risk factors for PPD.

    Any mother can develop postpartum depression, but these factors may increase your risk:

    • History of depression or other mood disorders
    • Unwanted or difficult pregnancy
    • Premature birth
    • Having twins or triplets
    • Recent stress, such as divorce, relationship issues, or death/illness of a loved one
    • Serious health problems
    • Lack of an emotional support network
    • Drug or alcohol misuse
    • Sleep deprivation
    • Poor diet

    Men can get postpartum depression, too.

    Up to 25 percent of new dads experience depression after a baby is born, a condition known as paternal postpartum depression. Men with financial instability, relationship issues, a history of depression, or a partner with PPD are most at risk. If you’re a new father experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, contact your doctor for help.

    Treatments are available for PPD.

    If you notice signs of postpartum depression, treat it with these tips:

    • Take antidepressants or other medication prescribed by your doctor.
    • Seek counseling from a psychiatrist, psychologist, or other mental health professional.
    • Practice self-care, such as eating well, exercising, meditating, and getting massages.
    • Communicate with your partner about how they can help.
    • Join a support group where you can commiserate with other new parents.

    While postpartum depression and other pregnancy complications are always possible, you and your partner may have made up your minds about becoming parents. If you previously had a vasectomy, the first step is to have it reversed. Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in helping men become fathers. To learn more about vasectomy reversal, please contact our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-894-6428 or schedule a free consultation online.