• Signs Your Partner is Approaching Labor

    From start to finish, pregnancy is tricky. Whether you’re waiting to learn if you’re pregnant or waiting for labor, the signs and symptoms involved can be confusing. Just as all people are different, all women experience childbirth a little differently, so a sign of labor for one person might not be there for another person. What’s more, every pregnancy is different! Even if you’ve been through a pregnancy before, labor can be a different experience the next time. If your partner is pregnant, it can be frustrating to try to decipher the signs. The following symptoms are fairly universal, though, so pay attention if any of these things seem to be happening.

    • Labor hormones can cause shivering. If it’s not cold and your partner is layering up, she might be in labor.
    • A loss of appetite could mean labor. Just as early pregnancy often causes women to feel nauseous and disinterested in food, labor beginning can cause the same symptoms, along with increased thirst. Ginger chews and ice chips can be very helpful.
    • Back pain can be a sign of impending labor. It’s understandable that a pregnant woman’s back will hurt, because she’s carrying around the extra weight of pregnancy. In the early stages of labor, though, that lower back pain may become intense. If she can’t seem to get comfortable, is having menstrual-like cramps, and her back is aching, pay attention because it could mean it’s almost time to head to the hospital.
    • As the due date grows nearer, pay attention to contractions. Your partner may have been experiencing Braxton Hicks contractions for some time, but if the contractions start getting stronger and longer, it could be almost time for the baby to arrive. How do you know when contractions are actually labor? They’ll come close together, around five minutes or so apart, and your partner will not be able to walk or talk through them.
    • When labor is approaching, the baby may drop. This can give your partner a feeling of lightness and she may be able to breathe and speak more easily because there’s less pressure on her diaphragm. The flip side of this is that she may have to go to the bathroom more often because there’s more pressure on her bladder.
    • Her water may break, and it may not be like the movies. Sometimes it’s just like you’d expect, a gush of fluids rushing out suddenly. However, it’s not always that obvious. Some women experience trickling fluid for a while, and may not realize that this is what’s happening. Encourage her to call her doctor if this is happening, because it means the “seal” around the baby has broken.
    • In the end stages of pregnancy, her joints may feel loose. Pregnancy hormones work to relax the joints, muscles and ligaments, to allow the pelvis to open and give birth. Unfortunately for your partner, those same hormones may loosen her bowels as well. The good news is, it’s a sign that birth is near.
    • If she’s fatigued but still obsessed with organizing the nursery, she’s probably getting close. It’s hard to sleep in the third trimester, which can lead to fatigue. By the same token, many women feel an urgency to “nest” right at the end of the pregnancy.

    If you think your partner is in labor or close to it, encourage her to call her medical provider. They won’t mind an extra phone call or two, and it’s better to be safe than sorry. It’s imperative to call if there’s bleeding or bright red discharge, her water breaks, or she experiences blurred or double vision, a severe headache, or sudden swelling, which can be signs of a life-threatening condition known as preeclampsia.  If she’s experiencing the signs of labor before the 37th week, call the doctor: it could be preterm labor. It’s always better to give the medical practitioner a call in the interest keeping both mom and baby healthy and safe.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • How to Set Good Examples for Your Children

    As any parent who has ever slipped and said a bad word in front of a toddler knows, children imitate what they witness. The challenge for parents, then, is to give their kids something really good to imitate. Do your little ones get a chance to see your good behavior? Here are some great ways to set good examples for your children.

    • Show kindness in big and small ways, in front of your kids. Send a card to a friend who is going through a difficult time, and let your kids sign their names. Pay for someone’s groceries or coffee or fast food meal. Hold the door for someone, or let someone go ahead of you in traffic or the parking lot. Offer to help an elderly neighbor, or just greet employees when you walk into a store. If you operate out of a spirit of kindness, your kids will notice.
    • Exhibit generosity, and give your kids a chance to participate in generous acts. Give your kids change to drop in a tip jar, or being them with you to volunteer in a community event. Let them help you make cookies for the school’s front-office staff or dinner for a family with a new baby. Make a habit of having them donate books and toys to those in need, whether it’s things they’ve outgrown or things they pick out to give at the holidays.
    • Give back to the helpers in your children’s world. Have your kids make cards or gifts for their teachers and the support staff at the school, in addition to whatever gift you’re giving. Give thank-you gifts to the postal worker, delivery people, and garbage collectors. Take cookies to the fire station. Let your children see and participate in expressions of appreciation.
    • Be genuinely interested in those around you. This includes your kids: sincerely pay attention to what they have to say. Really listen to other people too, and get to know the names of people you interact with regularly, like school staff, the mail carrier, and the cashier at your local grocery store. Notice when someone does something well, and be generous with your compliments.
    • Teach by example how to manage emotions and handle stress. It’s easy to react emotionally to stressful situations, but it’s not a good way to make decisions. Model calm to your children, and talk them through your decision-making process. Find healthy outlets for stress, and teach your children practices like mindfulness and deep breathing.
    • Cultivate a spirit of gratitude in your family. Regularly express gratitude for the blessings in your life, and encourage your kids to do the same. Value people and relationships over material possessions and wealth, and avoid complaining.
    • Demonstrate responsibility in all areas of your life. Take care of your body, live up to your commitments, and teach your kids how to use a calendar, a planner, and other organizational tools. Take pride in your work, and let your kids see that your work has meaning. Be a person of integrity, and do the things you say you’ll do.
    • Allow yourself to be vulnerable around your kids. Your kids need to know that flaws are normal, and failure is something everyone experiences. Tell them about obstacles you’ve overcome and show them what it means to be resilient. Model an attitude of continually striving toward self-improvement.
    • Don’t be afraid to admit when you’re wrong. Everyone slips up sometimes, and it’s good for your kids to know you’re not perfect. Treat your children like people, and apologize when you’re in the wrong. Being willing to admit mistakes is an important part of building a healthy, happy family.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Tips for Getting Pregnant at an Older Age

    About 100 years ago, the average age of a first time mother was 22. Today, that average is around 28, and many couples are choosing to start their families in their 30s or even later. This makes sense, because lifespans have also dramatically increased, and also because many modern couples are concerned with establishing their careers before having children. Unfortunately, waiting to conceive does bring its own set of challenges. After age 35, fertility declines, making it harder to get pregnant. The good news is that it’s not impossible to conceive in your late 30s or even 40s, and there are things you can do to improve your chances.

    What makes conceiving after age 35 difficult? For one thing, women ovulate less frequently. Egg quality and quantity also decline in the 30s and 40s, and pregnancy is riskier. It can take a long time for an older woman to conceive, and she’s more likely to develop conditions like high blood pressure and gestational diabetes. The risk of chromosomal abnormalities increases, and the risk of pregnancy loss is higher. Older moms are also more prone to premature delivery, and may end up needing a C-section. The father’s age plays a role as well. The decline of fertility is less predictable in men than in women, but research shows that men over 40 are 30 percent less likely to conceive than men in their 20s.

    What can you do? There are some lifestyle changes you can make to boost your fertility. While it’s not possible to increase the number of eggs, supplements like folic acid, melatonin, and Myo-inositol can improve egg quality and ovarian function. Cutting out smoking, limiting alcohol and caffeine, eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, reducing stress, and maintaining a healthy weight can also increase fertility. If you’re having trouble conceiving, take the following steps.

    • See your doctor. A pre-conception appointment gives you and your doctor the opportunity to review your medical history and discuss your lifestyle. Your doctor can help you determine if any medications you’re taking could interfere with your fertility and address any concerns you may have about conception.
    • Keep a journal of your fertility signs. Record your basal body temperature and cervical fluid so that you can determine the best time to try to conceive. When you carefully observe these signs, you’ll also have a better idea of whether or not you’re ovulating regularly.
    • Take an at-home fertility screening test. You can buy these over the counter to help rule out issues with both male and female fertility.
    • Consider taking a supplement. Try folic acid or Myo-inositol to help improve egg quality. Some women choose to take a prenatal vitamin throughout the process of trying to conceive, to help with their health as they try to achieve pregnancy.
    • Stay positive but don’t hesitate to seek help. It will probably take you longer to conceive than if you were younger, so don’t worry too much if it doesn’t happen right away. However, if six months of trying does not result in pregnancy, talk to your health care provider about fertility testing or contact a fertility specialist. There are many options available to help you start a family.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Healthy Foods Moms Should Consider Eating While Breastfeeding

    Will your baby be breastfed? It’s a very healthy option, with benefits for both mom and baby. Breast milk is packed with nutrients that are important for a baby’s development, and can help reduce a woman’s risk of medical conditions like heart disease and diabetes. It also promotes bonding with the baby, and can reduce stress. It takes a lot of energy to produce breast milk, though, and it’s important for a nursing mother to eat the right foods to keep up not only her energy, but also the supply and quality of her milk.

    When a woman is breastfeeding, her energy needs increase by about 500 calories. Adding these calories to the diet should involve consuming nutrient dense foods, including those that contain protein, vitamins D, A, E, C, and B12, selenium, and zinc. In addition to reducing fast food and processed food in the diet, a woman who is nursing should take care to stay hydrated and prioritize whole foods like:

    • Fish and seafood
    • Meat and poultry, including organ meats
    • Fruits and vegetables
    • Nuts and seeds
    • Healthy fats like avocados, olive oil, coconut eggs, and full-fat yogurt
    • Fiber rich starches like whole grains, quinoa butternut squash, sweet potatoes, lentils, and oats
    • Probiotics like tofu, dark chocolate, kimchi, and sauerkraut

    There’s no need to be limited to this list, but there are a few things that are advisable to avoid or reduce when breastfeeding. Caffeine can disrupt your baby’s sleep, so consume it in moderation. Alcohol should be strictly limited because it can make its way into breast milk. It’s ok to have a glass of wine, as long as it’s at least two hours before breastfeeding. Nursing moms should not smoke at all, and should not diet, because additional calories are needed for adequate milk supply. And while fish and seafood can be a healthy part of a breastfeeding woman’s diet, it’s wise to avoid fish that are high in mercury, like swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish. It’s not necessary to limit spicy foods or anything else the mom enjoys, but if the baby is fussy, consider keeping a food journal to determine if there’s a connection between eating certain things and the baby’s mood. Ask your doctor about supplements; in some cases, a multivitamin may be advisable.

    Eating well while breastfeeding is important for the health of both mom and baby. At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people by assisting with the healthy pregnancies that are the start of healthy families. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Everything you Need to Know About Colic

    Everyone knows that babies cry, and it’s something you expect when you have a newborn. But what happens when your baby seems to cry constantly, without ceasing, even when fed, dry, and healthy? If your baby cries for more than three hours a day, more than three days a week, for more than three weeks, seemingly for no reason, it’s probably colic.

    Colic typically starts around two weeks of age. If your baby was premature, it may start a little bit later. It usually goes away on its own by about three or four months, but it can feel like it goes on forever! The baby’s sex, birth order, and breast or bottle-feeding status don’t seem to have anything to do with colic, and colic doesn’t affect kids as they grow up.  If a baby has colic, he or she may cry with no clear reason, seem to be in pain, clench fists, stiffen arms, arch the back and curl the legs.

    What causes colic? There’s no clear answer, but doctors have several different theories. It could have to do with gas or the spasms of a growing digestive system, or it could be due to hormones that cause belly pain. Too much stimulation may lead to colic, especially if the baby is sensitive to light or noise. The developing nervous system could contribute to colic, or it could be an early form of childhood migraines. It may also be the result of fear, frustration, or excitement. Your little one may turn bright red and swallow so much air that the belly becomes tight and swollen. Often, colic starts at the same time every day, typically in the evening.

    If you think your baby has colic, see the pediatrician to rule out other problems, including a sensitivity to formula or breast milk, acid reflux, stomach issues, or trouble with eating too much or too little. You also want to make sure that it’s not an infection, inflammation of the brain and nervous system, or an uneven heartbeat. Sometimes, what people think is colic is actually an injury to bones, muscles, or fingers, or eye trouble.

    What can you do if your baby has colic? Because there’s no clear cause, there’s also no clear cure. Ask your doctor for advice, and take heart in knowing that colic is only temporary. When your baby is fussy, make sure he or she is not hungry. If you’re breastfeeding, pay attention to your diet and ask your doctor whether medications you’re taking could be contributing to the problem. You might want to avoid caffeine and chocolate so that you don’t overstimulate the baby, and steer clear of potential allergens like dairy products and nuts.

    You can also try to sooth your infant by trying things like:

    • Change your baby’s position, walk around holding her, rock or massage his back.
    • Try a pacifier.
    • Swaddle the baby.
    • Hold your infant, skin to skin.
    • Try white noise or the sound of a heartbeat.
    • Go for a car ride.
    • Use a swing or vibrating seat.

    While you’re trying to calm your little one, make sure you and your partner are taking care of yourselves. Colic can be overwhelming for a parent, and healthy parents are at the heart of a healthy family. At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start healthy, happy families. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Things You Should Do Before Your Partner Goes into Labor

    Waiting for the arrival of a new baby is very exciting! It may seem like it’s a long way away but trust us, if your partner is pregnant, that baby is right around the corner. Are you ready? Here are some things you and your partner need to do before labor begins.

    • Get the baby gear ready. You may already be preparing the nursery, but now is also the time to unbox and assemble all the things you got at the baby shower! Install your car seat, assemble your changing table, swing, bouncer, and other equipment you’ll use in the first few months. In fact, if you have room for it all, you can go ahead and put together things your baby won’t use for quite a while. Trust us, you won’t feel like assembling that exersaucer while holding a baby.
    • Load up on essentials. Stockpile things like cleaning products, paper products, and toiletries, so that you don’t have to think about shopping while you’re sleep-deprived and caring for a newborn. While you’re at it, stock your medicine chest with over the counter medicines and first-aid supplies, as well as any prescriptions you might forget to refill once you’re preoccupied with a baby.
    • Fill your freezer. You may have meals lined up through your friends and family members, but it never hurts to stick some casseroles in the freezer. It’s good to have healthy meals available so you won’t be tempted to order out.
    • Make arrangements for your furry babies. If you’ve got pets, anticipate that they’re going to need some care when the baby comes. Arrange not only for someone to take care of them while you’re in the hospital, but also for someone to come play with them and give them attention after you’re home. Expect them to be a little jealous when you’re giving all of your attention to this new little stranger.
    • Plan some nights out. Have a last hoorah with your friends or plan a babymoon for the two of you. The mom-to-be might also want to take a day all to herself to be self-indulgent and pampered. It will be a while before you get another chance to hit the town, so you might as well do it before the baby arrives.
    • Schedule some preventive care. Go to the optometrist, the dentist, and any other doctor you might need to see for routine care before your calendar fills up with baby care.
    • Make plans for the birth announcement. Are you planning to hire a photographer to take newborn photos? Get an appointment in the books! If you’re planning to mail out birth announcements, design them ahead of time, so that when the baby comes you can just fill in the details and get them done.
    • Get ready for the hospital trip. This means taking a hospital tour, packing a bag, and driving the route you’ll take when the baby comes so that it will be familiar when it’s go time. As the due date approaches, make sure to keep your gas tank full.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

     

  • How to Prepare for When Your Partner Goes into Labor

    Did you know that supporting a woman during childbirth is an important job? Research indicates that women who have support during labor are more likely to have a positive outcome. If your partner is pregnant, you should be prepared to take on a supportive role when the big day arrives, providing her with comfort, strength and encouragement. In return, you’ll get to share in one of the most meaningful and powerful moments of your life together. Here are some tips to make sure you’re ready for what’s in store.

    • Learn as much as you can before the baby arrives. Attend a childbirth class: in-person classes are preferable, but if that’s not possible, take an online course and watch videos so that you’ll be prepared. Read as much as you can, so you’ll feel confident when your child makes an appearance. Make a birth plan and discuss labor strategies with your partner.
    • Expect to hurry up and wait. During the last trimester, many women experience Braxton Hicks contractions. This is a belly-tightening sensation that can feel like labor, but it’s just the body’s way of preparing for childbirth. Even when labor does begin, there will probably be several hours before it’s time to go to the hospital. It’s important to understand the stages of labor.
      • The first stage consists of three phases.
        • Early labor: During this time, the woman’s water may break, triggering labor. Contractions may feel like persistent low back pain, and will become longer, stronger, and closer together as labor progresses. It’s often more comfortable to spend the earliest part of labor at home, timing contractions so you’ll know when to head to the hospital. Generally, that time comes when the contractions are about five minutes apart.
        • Active phase: By this time, you’ll be at the hospital, and the contractions will be more intense, spaced three to five minutes apart, lasting 40-60 seconds. Your partner will need your help with breathing exercises and relaxation techniques you learned in the childbirth class, and she may want to opt for pain relief. It can also be helpful for you to massage her temples or apply counterpressure to her back. On the other hand, she may not want to be touched. Every woman is different and it’s important to listen to your partner and find out what she needs.
        • Transition phase: This is an intense phase, during which contractions will last 60-90 seconds and be about two to three minutes apart.
      • Birth happens during the second stage. This stage can last minutes to hours and includes pushing and delivery.
      • The third stage begins after the baby is born. The placenta is delivered five to ten minutes later, and it’s common for the mom to feel shaky or get chills. Now is a good time for you as the partner to offer a warm blanket. It’s also a great opportunity to hold your newborn child and let your partner rest.
    • Be prepared to be flexible. The strategies you have planned for labor may not pan out. The birth plan may have to change. You may feel faint or queasy, and labor may not go the way you expect. The important thing is that you’re bringing new life into the world and your partner has you as an advocate and a source of support.

    If you’re ready to start a family, call the Center for Vasectomy Reversal. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

     

  • Understanding Pregnancy Cravings

    Pregnancy changes every part of your body, from your scalp to your feet. It’s not surprising, then, that it changes your appetite and taste in food. When you’re pregnant, you’ll loathe some of the foods you usually love and crave things that will surprise you. Pickles and ice cream is the most cliched combination when it comes to pregnancy cravings, but it’s far from far-fetched.

    What causes pregnancy cravings? No one really knows for sure, but it’s not a myth. Research indicates that somewhere between 50 and 90 percent of pregnant women in the United States experience cravings. Pregnancy cravings typically begin by the end of the first trimester, are at their strongest in the second trimester, and decline as the birth approaches. A woman who is breastfeeding may also experience cravings, though, and will continue to have an increased appetite because caloric needs are higher in both pregnancy and breastfeeding.

    Even though experts haven’t determined the precise reason for cravings, there are some theories about why they happen.

    • Hormonal fluctuations can affect the way you experience food. The hormonal shifts in pregnancy can affect the sense of smell, sensory experience of food, mood, and the types of food a person craves.
    • A heightened sense of smell often accompanies pregnancy. This can have an impact on which food a woman wants to eat. Foods that smell strong or pungent may be overwhelming, while things that smell good can increase appetite.
    • Nutritional needs change during pregnancy. Sometimes, a craving is just the body’s way of expressing what it needs. A craving for ice cream, for instance, can indicate a need for more calcium. If you’re pregnant and craving ice cream, go ahead and eat it! But be mindful of the need for calcium and make sure you’re getting enough from healthy sources like dark leafy greens and fish.
    • Sometimes cravings are all about comfort. Pregnancy is uncomfortable and can increase cravings for comfort foods that bring back childhood memories of being loved and cared-for. The nausea of pregnancy can lead to a craving for foods that typically bring relief during illness.
    • A woman’s culture impacts her cravings. Women in the United States often crave chocolate, for instance, while women in Japan may crave rice.

    The most common pregnancy cravings in the United States include sweets, high-calorie, savory carbohydrates, animal protein, and fruit. Fast food, pickles, ice cream, fruit juices, chocolate, dairy, and vegetables also make the list. While it’s ok to give into these cravings from time to time, limit the unhealthy ones and make sure you’re loading your diet with the right nutrients. These include calcium, folic acid, iron, and protein.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping people start families with healthy pregnancies. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • Why it’s Important to Teach your Children about other Holiday Celebrations from other Cultures

    During the holiday season, it’s exciting to share special traditions and celebrations with our families. It’s important for children to have that sense of ritual, creating memories each year that deepen family bonds and strengthen your shared beliefs. Have you ever considered incorporating the holidays of other cultures into your season? December is packed full of holidays and can be a great jumping off point for teaching your children about other cultures and religions.

    Why should you be purposeful about introducing the traditions of other cultures to your children? When children learn about other cultures, they learn that even though people may look different, speak different languages, and have different traditions, we’re all the same at heart, with customs they hold dear, and an innate capacity to love. Instilling this concept in children when they’re young can nurture a deeper appreciation for other cultures.

    The reason the holidays are such a great place to start is that it’s easy to find information on other cultures and interesting things to do to celebrate them. Educate yourself on major holidays beyond the ones your family observes and share that information with your kids. Check your local library for children’s books about holidays, take the time to learn a fun game or a song, or prepare foods traditionally used to celebrate an unfamiliar holiday. You may even end up incorporating some aspects of another culture’s holiday into your own family’s celebration each year. If your family celebrates Christmas, consider exploring these holidays:

    • Hanukkah: This eight-day “festival of lights” is the Jewish celebration of the Maccabee’s fight for freedom. There’s a nightly menorah lighting, as well as special prayers and food.
    • Nicholas Day: Mostly celebrated in Europe, this holiday falls on December 6th and honors St. Nicholas. One way to connect with the holiday is to read the legends of St. Nicholas. On St. Nicholas Day, children put shoes outside of their doors so St. Nicholas can leave gifts or treats.
    • Lucia Day: In Sweden, on December 13th, young girls dress in white gowns with red sashes, a wreath of burning candles on their heads. They wake their families by singing songs and bringing them coffee and saffron buns. This festival of lights honors an early Christian martyr.
    • Las Posadas: From December 16th through Christmas Eve, Las Posadas is celebrated in Mexico, Central America, and parts of the United States. The nine days represent the nine months of Mary’s pregnancy, and the holiday commemorates the journey Mary and Joseph took to Bethlehem. One important symbol of the holiday is the poinsettia.
    • Kwanzaa: A holiday that honors African American heritage, Kwanzaa is celebrated from December 26th to January 1st. Kwanzaa means “first fruits” and it’s an opportunity to celebrate family life and unity while honoring ancient African traditions. It’s based on harvest festivals and ends with a large feast.

    No matter what traditions you choose to raise your children with, the first step is to start a family. If you’re having trouble doing that, call the Center for Vasectomy Reversal. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.

  • How to Pick the Perfect Christmas Gifts for your Kids

    The holiday season is upon us, and a big part of the joy of Christmas is choosing the perfect gift for everyone on your list. When you’re shopping for your kids, though, this can be a difficult task. How do you find the right gifts for your children without just adding to the clutter in their rooms? We’ve got some tips to help you with your holiday shopping this year.

    • First, consider the children as individuals. Think about their ages and stages of development, as well as their interests. What do they enjoy doing? What topics really spark their interests? Taking some time to really think about what lights up each child’s face can help you find the perfect gifts.
    • Set some limits for yourself. Kids don’t need every toy that hits the market, and they don’t even need every single item in a line of toys they love. In fact, too many toys on Christmas morning can be overwhelming for a child and decrease the enjoyment of the holiday. There’s a rhyme that’s sometimes used to help children make their wish lists, and it goes, “Something you want, something you need, something to wear and something to read.” This isn’t a bad guideline for parents to use while they’re choosing toys. Simplicity should be the goal and setting a budget and other constraints will help you achieve it.
    • Think about a toy’s educational value. This doesn’t mean that every toy has to teach numbers or the alphabet. Toys that spark the imagination are wonderful for helping kids learn. Consider the fact that kids learn the most through playing and you’ll see why it’s so important to keep the learning potential of the toy in mind. Some types of toys that can be educational include:
      • Building toys
      • Play kitchens
      • Art supplies
      • Dolls
      • Cars and trucks
      • Puzzles
      • Musical toys
      • Board games
      • Books
    • Choose toys with staying power. The trendiest toys are often the ones that get the least play once the initial excitement has passed. On the other hand, classic toys like blocks, board games, and puzzles can get years of use and encourage cooperative play. While you’re thinking about toys with long lifespans, consider the quality of the toys you’re seeing. Choose sturdy, well-made, high-quality toys, checking for safety issues like pieces that can come off and cause a choking hazard. Stop before you buy something cheap and plastic to consider that, while you can buy several inexpensive items that are cheaply made, spending that money on fewer things of lasting quality is a better use of funds and will provide more enjoyment for the children.

    If you previously had a vasectomy but now, you’re ready to start a family, call the Center for Vasectomy Reversal. We pride ourselves on helping men improve their fertility through uncompromising, concierge-level patient care. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website or call 941-894-6428.