• Vasectomy Reversal Myths

    As you contemplate whether a vasectomy reversal is right for you, you may stumble upon common myths about this surgical procedure. Dispel any misunderstandings before you meet with a microsurgeon about reversing your vasectomy.

    Myth: A vasectomy reversal is as straightforward as a vasectomy.

    Almost any doctor can perform a vasectomy, a short and relatively simple surgery that requires minimal training. However, a correctly performed vasectomy reversal is an advanced, technically challenging microsurgery lasting two to three hours. You should only trust an expert microsurgeon with years of successful reversals to increase the chance of success and lower the risk of complications.

    Myth: All vasectomy reversals have the same chance of success.

    Talk to your surgeon about what could affect the success of your surgery before deciding to have a vasectomy reversal. Factors may include:

    • Sperm count and mobility
    • Any development of anti-sperm antibodies
    • Scar tissue following surgery
    • Fertility of your female partner
    • Length of time since your vasectomy

    Myth: A vasectomy reversal must be performed within 10 years to have any chance of success.

    If you had your vasectomy less than five years ago, there is a greater than 95 percent chance of sperm in the ejaculate. Surgeries performed five to 10 years ago have about a 90 percent chance, and if 10 or more years have elapsed, there’s an 80 to 90 percent chance. Experienced surgeons can perform successful reversals over 20 years after a vasectomy. (Note: pregnancy rates are lower than the percentages given here and depend on numerous factors.)

    Myth: Pursuing IVF is better than having a vasectomy reversal.

    While in vitro fertilization is a viable infertility treatment, it should not be your first choice. IVF costs three to five times more than vasectomy reversal surgery, and it comes with serious risks to the mother and baby—all with no guarantee of a successful pregnancy. With the costs, risks, and success rates in mind, a reversal with natural conception makes more sense for most couples.

    Myth: Some vasectomy methods are not reversible.

    It is extremely rare for a vasectomy to be performed in such a way that a microsurgeon cannot reverse it. The only time this can happen is if the original surgeon removes too much of the vas deferens, the tube that transports sperm from the testes to the urethra. In this case, there is nothing to reattach, and the reversal cannot be done. Again, this is very uncommon and can be ruled out prior to surgery via a physical exam.

    Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in microscopic infertility procedures. If you have decided to pursue parenthood, we can help. Dr. Green has completed hundreds of vasectomy reversal surgeries and takes great pride in his remarkable success rates. We’ll discuss your surgical options, costs, and the chance of success based on your specific situation. To learn more, please call our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-894-6428 or schedule a free consultation online.

  • Symptoms of Male Infertility

    Fertility difficulties affect nearly one in seven couples who are trying to have a baby. “Infertility” is defined as the inability to conceive despite having frequent, unprotected intercourse for a year or longer. In up to half of all cases, male infertility is at least partially to blame. Consider what male infertility looks like and how you can combat it.

    Causes of Male Infertility

    Low fertility in men is a complex subject. In short, semen must contain enough healthy, functional sperm to produce a pregnancy. There are many possible reasons why this may not be the case, including:

    • Varicocele (swelling of the veins that drain the testicle)
    • Infections, including epididymitis, orchitis, gonorrhea, or HIV
    • Retrograde ejaculation
    • Dysfunctional immune cells that attack sperm
    • Cancer and nonmalignant tumors
    • Undescended testicles
    • Hormone imbalances
    • Tubule defects or blockages
    • Chromosome defects
    • Erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation
    • Celiac disease
    • Certain medications
    • Vasectomy or other surgeries on the testicles, scrotum, or prostate
    • Exposure to industrial chemicals, heavy metals, or radiation
    • Overheated testicles
    • Drug, tobacco, and alcohol use
    • Obesity

    Symptoms of Male Infertility

    Apart from being unable to conceive a child, there may be no other indications that you are infertile. However, depending on the underlying cause, these additional symptoms may be present:

    • Sexual dysfunction, such as difficulty maintaining an erection, limited ejaculation, or low sex drive
    • Pain, swelling, or lump in the testicle area
    • Abnormal breast growth (gynecomastia)
    • Decreased facial or body hair

    Treatments for Male Infertility

    If you are struggling to get your partner pregnant, consider that simple lifestyle changes can make a difference. Here’s what to try first:

    • Quit smoking, limit your alcohol use, and avoid illicit drugs.
    • Maintain a healthy weight.
    • Reduce your stress level.
    • Steer clear of chemicals and other environmental hazards.
    • Avoid tightly fitting underwear and jeans.
    • Don’t take steroids for bodybuilding or sporting purposes.

    More formal treatments for male infertility include:

    • Surgery to correct obstructed tubules or reverse a prior vasectomy
    • Antibiotic treatment for underlying infections
    • Medication or counseling for erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation
    • Hormone treatments and medications

    One in eight male infertility cases are treatable, allowing couples to get pregnant naturally after receiving the proper care. If male infertility treatment doesn’t work, you may still be a candidate for assisted reproductive technology (ART). This involves collecting sperm to be inserted into the female reproductive system or used with in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Your doctor might also suggest considering a sperm donor or adopting a child.

    Dr. Joshua Green of the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is a leader in helping men overcome infertility problems. All infertility procedures, including vasectomy reversal, are performed with state-of-the-art equipment, including a high-powered operating microscope. Patients can expect concierge-level care and friendly staff interactions every step of the way. To learn more, please call 941-894-6428 or schedule a free consultation online.

  • Help Getting Pregnant: Things You and Your Partner Can Do

    The journey into parenthood can be emotionally charged. Once you and your partner are ready to conceive, follow these tips to increase your fertility.

    Know Your “Fertile Window”

    A man’s sperm is most likely to reach a woman’s fertile egg on ovulation day and the five days leading up to it. Most women ovulate about 12 to 16 days before starting each period, so track your menstrual cycle on a calendar to help you better predict when you might be ovulating. Then, have sex with your partner every other day during this six-day “fertile window.”

    Maintain a Healthy Body Weight

    Being overweight makes it harder to get pregnant, but so does being underweight. Strive for a body max index (BMI) in the “normal” range of 18.5 to 24.9. At the same time, don’t exercise too much. Strenuous physical activity could interfere with ovulation, so work with your doctor to determine a moderate exercise plan that will work for you.

    Eat a Balanced Diet

    In addition to helping you achieve a healthy weight, eating a balanced diet provides your body with fertility-promoting nutrients. While trying to get pregnant, eat more:

    • Fruits and vegetables
    • Lean protein
    • Whole grains
    • Lentils and beans

    Then, eat less:

    • High-mercury fish
    • Soda
    • Caffeine
    • Trans fats

    Take Prenatal Vitamins

    It doesn’t hurt to start taking prenatal vitamins as soon as you start trying to conceive. Finding a prenatal vitamin that agrees with your system now makes it easy to stay on it during pregnancy. Choose a supplement that provides at least 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid to promote healthy brain and spine development in your future fetus. Dietary sources of folic acid include leafy greens, broccoli, beans, citrus fruits, orange juice, and fortified cereals.

    Stop Smoking and Drinking

    Smoking causes fertility issues in men and women alike. Even secondhand smoke can affect the chances of becoming pregnant, so keep away. Also, because alcohol consumption can cause birth defects, a sexually active woman should stop drinking as soon as she goes off birth control. Cannabis and other recreational drugs should be avoided as well while trying to conceive.

    De-Stress

    Research shows that high stress levels make it more difficult to get pregnant. Of course, relaxing is easier said than done. Try reducing stress in your daily life with these tips:

    • Take a walk.
    • Learn deep breathing exercises.
    • Get plenty of sleep.
    • Find activities that make you smile and laugh.
    • Try yoga or meditation.
    • Go on vacation.
    • Catch up with an old friend.
    • Avoid overbooking yourself.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping men and women become parents. If you’re ready to begin your journey into parenthood, consider a vasectomy reversal performed under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green. Our state-of-the-art clinic in Sarasota, FL provides a comfortable setting to receive your fast, effective procedure. To learn more, please call us at 941-894-6428 or schedule your free consultation online.

  • Things you can do to Improve Your Sperm Count

    A low sperm count is one of the most common factors in male infertility. If you’re struggling to conceive, it’s important to see your doctor. However, if your problem is low sperm count, you may be able to improve it naturally through a few simple lifestyle changes.

    • Stay active. Regular exercise increases testosterone, which improves the quality of semen. Bear in mind that too much exercise can reduce testosterone levels, so it’s important to strike a healthy balance. Some sources indicate that weightlifting and outdoor exercise may be particularly beneficial.
    • Lost weight. One benefit of exercise is that it can help reduce your weight, which can increase your sperm count. A recent study showed that men at a healthy weight have more mobile sperm than those at an unhealthy BMI, and weight loss has been shown to significantly increase semen volume, concentration, mobility, and sperm health. If you have a lot of weight to lose, losing even a little bit can help.
    • Relax! When you’re under stress, sex is less satisfying, and fertility is reduced. Additionally, stress can raise cortisol levels, inhibiting testosterone levels. Taking time to unwind every day can help boost your fertility. Make sure to get enough sleep, too, because men who get seven to eight hours of sleep each night have better fertility health.
    • Mind your substances. Don’t drink heavily, don’t smoke, or use tobacco, and avoid illegal drug use. If you smoke or have a substance abuse problem, get help from your doctor.
    • Eat a healthy diet. Pack your diet with nutrient-dense foods, including citrus fruits, green vegetables, nuts and seeds, plant-based oils, beef, and chicken. Focus on antioxidants, which can boost your sperm count. Consider supplements, because vitamins like D, C, E, and CoQ10 and minerals like zinc can help sperm health. Because plant estrogen, called phytoestrogens, reduce men’s sperm production, it’s best to avoid consuming too much soy.
    • Clean up your environment. Environmental toxins may affect your sperm count, and while you can’t control pollution, you can limit your exposure to harmful substances in your environment. Substances like pesticides, painting materials, herbicides, degreasers, and solvents can all negatively impact fertility. Radiation and x-rays are harmful to sperm production, and overheating the testicles by wearing tight clothing, visiting a sauna, or working with a laptop in your lap can also lower your sperm count.
    • Herbal supplements may help. If you’re interested in natural food supplements, you might try holistic remedies like fenugreek, Tribulus terrestris, ashwagandha, or maca root.

    At the Center for Vasectomy Reversal, we love helping men improve their fertility and build their families. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other fertility concerns. To learn more, contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 for a free consultation.

  • Things That Affect Male Fertility

    The journey to parenthood is straightforward for many, but up to 15 percent of couples fail to conceive after a year of trying to get pregnant. Male infertility plays a role in over one-third of these cases. Consider the factors that affect male fertility and what you can do to improve your chances of conceiving a child with your partner.

    Causes of Male Infertility

    You could have trouble getting your partner pregnant if you have any of the following:

    • Low sperm count
    • Abnormal sperm function
    • Blockages that prevent the delivery of sperm
    • Low testosterone levels

    What Affects Male Fertility?

    The following factors play a role in your sperm count, function, delivery, and testosterone levels:

    • Varicocele: Having enlarged veins within the scrotum is the most common reversible cause of male infertility.
    • Infection: Some infections interfere with sperm health or production, including several STDs, such as gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and HIV.
    • Substance use: Drugs, alcohol, and tobacco can lower testosterone levels and sperm count.
    • Overall health: Being overweight or having high blood pressure may reduce fertility. Other medical causes include undescended testicles, tumors, hormone imbalances, chromosome defects, and untreated celiac disease.
    • Ejaculation issues: Various conditions may prevent proper ejaculation, including diabetes, spinal cord injuries, medications, and surgery of the bladder, urethra, or prostate.
    • Environmental factors: Overexposure to heat, radiation, heavy metals, and industrial chemicals may reduce sperm count or function. Even prolonged biking, horseback riding, or physically demanding work can affect fertility.
    • Emotional factors: High stress may interfere with hormones needed to produce sperm. Depression can also cause sexual dysfunction that can cause male fertility issues.

    How to Improve Male Fertility

    Being unable to conceive a child can be frustrating and stressful. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to improve your fertility:

    • Receive treatment for underlying medical conditions.
    • Talk to your doctor about switching medications if infertility is a side effect of anything you’re currently taking.
    • Consider the changes you can make to reduce physical strain at work and in your daily life.
    • Wear boxers, not briefs, to avoid elevated temperatures and tightness that could affect sperm count.
    • Adopt stress management techniques, such as meditation, aromatherapy, yoga, and breathing exercises.
    • Examine your lifestyle. If you use substances or are overweight, improving your health may increase your fertility.
    • Schedule a doctor visit to check your fertility, especially if you experience sexual dysfunction, pain or swelling in the testicle area, abnormal breast growth, or hormonal irregularities along with fertility issues.

    Did you previously have a vasectomy, but now you’re ready to start or grow your family? Dr. Joshua Green at the Center for Vasectomy Reversal can make your dream of fatherhood a reality. We provide state-of-the-art treatment for men looking to reverse a vasectomy or address other fertility concerns. To learn more, please call our Sarasota, FL clinic at 941-894-6428 or schedule a free consultation through our website.

  • Things That Can Harm Male Fertility

    For nearly 15 percent of American couples, infertility is a real struggle. Many factors have an impact on fertility, and both partners’ health plays a key role. Male infertility is about half the reason that couples fail to conceive, but do you know what factors into male fertility? Knowing the things that can harm male fertility can help you safeguard yours.

    Low sperm production, abnormal sperm function, and blockages that prevent sperm delivery are the primary causes of male infertility. These issues may be the result of an underlying health problem, sometimes one over which you have no control. However, lifestyle factors can also have a major impact.

    A recent study linked manual labor with low sperm counts. In a study of 456 men around the age of 32, researchers discovered that 13 percent of the men with physically demanding jobs had low sperm count, as opposed to only 6 percent of men without strenuous work. Other things that had a negative impact on fertility included:

    • High blood pressure
    • Smoking or using tobacco
    • Using alcohol and marijuana excessively
    • Taking certain illicit drugs including anabolic steroids and cocaine.
    • Being overweight
    • Suffering emotional stress
    • Overheated testicles from frequent use of saunas or hot tubs, prolonged sitting, wearing tight clothing, or working on a laptop for extended periods
    • Exposure to toxins like benzenes, pesticides, herbicides, etc. which can lower sperm count
    • Current or past STIs including chlamydia and gonorrhea
    • Certain prolonged activities like biking or horseback riding, especially on a hard seat or poorly adjusted bicycle

    Other medical causes include hormonal imbalances, sperm duct defects, undescended testicles, tumors, and varicocele. A varicocele is a swelling of the veins that drain the testicles, and this swelling can prevent normal cooling. This is the most common cause of male infertility, but it’s also, fortunately, reversible. Varicoceles are often asymptomatic at first, but can enlarge, becoming noticeable or causing pain.

    Unless you’re trying to conceive and having difficulty, you may not be aware that you have fertility issues. However, in some cases, there are signs and symptoms. If you experience problems with sexual function, pain, swelling or a lump in the testicle area, frequent respiratory infections, or decreased facial or body hair, schedule a visit with your doctor to check on your fertility.

    If you’re struggling with infertility or considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and offer a payment plan for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.

     

  • Fertility Myths that Should be Left in the Last Decade

    As we move into a whole new decade, with exciting new medical technology and new scientific discoveries making the news all the time, you’d think we’d leave old myths by the wayside. It’s surprising to note, then, that some people still believe a number of untrue things about healthcare. Fertility, in particular, is plagued by persistent myths. Have you fallen for any of these? It’s time to shake them off and move forward.

    • Menstruation is connected to the moon. The idea that a woman’s cycle and the lunar cycle is a fairly popular notion. It’s easy to see why: menstrual cycles are typically about 28 days, and the moon’s cycle, from new moon to new moon, is about 29.5. There’s no evidence, however, to suggest that this is more than coincidence. If there was a moon-menstruation connection, what purpose would that serve?
    • To become pregnant, lie down after sex. It’s widely believed that lying down for a certain period of time after sex can increase your odds of conception. In fact, there’s no evidence that remaining prone is helpful at all: after sex, the sperm likely to fertilize the egg have already gotten where they need to go.
    • Menopause is unnatural. Some people believe that women were never meant to go through menopause, because for much of history women did not live long enough to experience it. This myth comes from the idea that women’s value is tied up in reproduction. In fact, even in the 17th century, women lived an average of 60 years. Men didn’t live much longer than that, but society wasn’t as interested in their reproductive function and its decline.
    • The female orgasm promotes conception. In order for a female orgasm to propel sperm, it would have to happen at the same time as the male orgasm, and that’s rare.
    • The HPV vaccine causes premature ovarian failure. The human papillomavirus vaccine is somewhat controversial, and in the vaccine literature, there was mention of six cases of premature ovarian failure. However, a much larger study disproved the connection with the vaccine.
    • Men are forever fertile. Though some men can father children in their old age, for most men fertility declines with age, and there’s a marked decline in the success of fertility treatments for men over 50.

    If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and offer a payment plan for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.

  • New Research about Infertility is Promising

    One in eight couples has trouble conceiving. Do you know how many of the cases are caused by unexplained male infertility? Nearly a quarter. For years, scientists have known that infertility can be linked to sperm that fail to throw out histones from DNA during development, but the reasons for this failure and how it happens is unclear. Now, however, that lack of clarity may be changing.

    Promising new research out of Penn Medicine is showing the precise location of the retained histones and the key gene that regulates them. Researchers have also created a mouse model with a mutated version of the gene. This allows investigators to track the defects in sperm, starting with the early stages of sperm development and going through fertilization. This research could lead us to a better understanding of infertility in men, and how epigenetic mutations are passed to future generations.

    What does it mean, when sperm fail to evict histones?  Histones are the main proteins in chromatin. Their function is to package DNA and turn genes on and off. Healthy sperm lose about 90-95 percent of these proteins, replacing them with protamines, smaller proteins able to pack DNA into tiny sperm. When a man has unexplained infertility, the problem is often with retained histones. The sperm count can be normal, the sperm have normal motility, and yet because the histones are in the wrong location, the couple has trouble conceiving.

    Until now, research has produced conflicting results about where these histones are located. Because of the confusion of discrepant data, the burden of assisted-reproductive technologies has continued to fall on women. Even if the male has the issue, the female partner goes through hormone injections and procedures to promote a higher fertility rate.

    Imagine, then, if scientists were able to use epigenetic therapies to change the levels of histones and protamines in men. With this new research, scientists are better able to closely study the mechanisms behind a mutated sperm’s trajectory, which opens the door to potential therapeutic treatments. Epigenetic drugs are already being used to treat cancer and other diseases. With a clearer understanding of how a man’s epigenome affects conception and embryonic development, we have the potential to alter sperm, so these new studies may lead to a breakthrough infertility treatment.

    If you’re struggling with infertility or considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and offer a payment plan for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.

  • Should Men Take Pre-Natal Vitamins?

    When you’re trying to conceive, it’s extremely important to take care of your health. A woman who is trying to get pregnant will work to stay at a healthy weight, watch her diet, stop drinking and smoking, and take prenatal vitamins, to make sure she gives her potential baby the very best start possible. But what about the potential father? Men can also take steps to improve their fertility, including taking prenatal vitamins. 

    Many of the things men can do to up their chances of fathering a child are the same things that women do when they’re trying to conceive. Maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and eating a healthful diet are all good steps to take, as are getting enough sleep and reducing stress. Additionally, men who want to procreate should not wear constrictive underwear or take long soaks in the bath or hot tub.  

    Why take all of these measures? A man’s age, diet, and lifestyle can have an effect on his sperm health, which has an impact on fertility but also on the child’s development and long-term health. A newborn’s predisposition for chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease can result from poor behavior or health of the mother or father before they even conceive. Three to six months prior to conception is a great time to improve your lifestyle, and that includes taking a prenatal vitamin.  

    The best prenatal vitamin for a man to take is not the same as a woman’s prenatal vitamin because some of the nutrients in prenatal vitamins can cause problems for men. It’s advised that men take a multivitamin formulated for adults or specifically for men, rather than taking a prenatal vitamin formulated for a woman. Men need nutrients like calcium and iron, which are in prenatal vitamins, but not at the doses those vitamins contain. In fact, too much calcium has been linked to cardiovascular disease in men, and too much iron can lead to a host of issues, including gastrointestinal problems, liver problems, and dangerously low blood pressure. What’s more, prenatal vitamins contain folic acid, which is important for women to take to prevent birth defects, but which has been linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer. Before taking any kind of supplement, it’s smart to talk to your doctor and get a recommendation for the right formulation for you.  

    One major roadblock to a man’s fertility is a vasectomy, but even that can be overcome with new microsurgery techniques for reconnecting the vas deferens. If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.  

  • Things that can Harm Male Fertility

    For some couples, conceiving a child is a simple and straightforward process. For others, though, fertility can be a complicated situation. For nearly fifteen percent of American couples who haven’t conceived after trying for a year, the label of infertility becomes their reality. Many factors come into play when it comes to fertility, and about half of the couples who are unable to conceive face this problem because of male infertility. Why is it harder for some men to conceive with a partner?  

    Men usually face infertility due to low sperm production, abnormal sperm function, or blockages that inhibit the delivery of sperm. Sometimes, these problems arise because of underlying health issues. However, a man’s lifestyle also has an impact on his fertility. In fact, if you’re struggling with infertility, it could even be due to your job.  

    A recent study of 456 men in their early 30s found that men in physically demanding jobs were more than twice as likely to have low sperm counts. In fact, 13 percent of the men in those types of jobs had low sperm counts, as opposed to just 6 percent of men whose work was not as strenuous. Researchers even looked at other factors like late-night shifts, heat, noise, and prolonged sitting, and found that the physical aspect of the job was the only one of these factors that impacted semen quality.  

    Of course, just because that’s the only one of those particular factors to have an effect, it doesn’t mean there aren’t other factors at play. High blood pressure, for instance, is also associated with fertility issues, including abnormally shaped spermThe data isn’t conclusive as to whether the high blood pressure itself is the problem, or if the problem is caused by the treatment used to combat the high blood pressure, though it was noted that men who took multiple medications were more prone to low sperm counts.  

    If you’re struggling with infertility, it may be helpful to know that there are other lifestyle factors that have an impact as well. These include: 

    • Smoking tobacco. 
    • Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol or smoking marijuana.  
    • Taking drugs, including steroids and cocaine.  
    • Being overweight.  
    • Stress, particularly emotional stress.  
    • Overheating the testicles by using saunas or hot tubs, or by wearing tight clothing or working long hours on a laptop.  
    • Exposure to toxic chemicals like pesticides, herbicides, and benzenes.  
    • Current or past exposure to STIs, like chlamydia or gonorrhea.  
    • Biking or horseback riding for long periods of time.  

    Of course, infertility can also have a medical cause. Hormonal imbalances, sperm duct defects, undescended testicles, and tumors all come into play. One common, reversible cause of male infertility is a varicocele, which is a swelling of the veins that drain the testicles. This can prevent normal cooling, but it’s typically asymptomatic. Sometimes, it causes the testicles to swell. It can, in rare cases, cause painVaricoceles are typically treated surgically.  

    One major roadblock to a man’s fertility is a vasectomy, but even that can be overcome with new microsurgery techniques for reconnecting the vas deferens. If you’re considering a vasectomy reversal, the Center for Vasectomy Reversal is here to help. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Green, our caring and skilled team provides state-of-the-art treatment for men who need a reversal of their vasectomy or have other concerns about their fertility. We accept major credit cards as well as cash and checks, and we also offer a payment plan option for those who are unable to pay the entire fee at the time of surgery. Whether you’re ready to schedule a procedure or just have questions and want to learn more, you can contact us through our website, or call 941-894-6428 to arrange a free consultation.